Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords (D&D 3.5)
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Post Posted: Mon Sep 21, 2015 7:48 pm 
 

Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords

What's the deal with this book?

Found a copy at the local Half Price Books in their collectible case for $50.  Looked on Amazon and offers for used start at $48.  Same on Bookfinder.  Noble Knight has a NM copy for $85.

So is this book really worth it?  Or is it just dealer price gouging for a low print run book?

  

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Post Posted: Mon Sep 21, 2015 8:17 pm 
 

A quick look at eBay recent sales data seems to indicate the book goes for about $30.00 give or take $10.00.  One copy even sold for less than $10 including shipping.

I do not recommend using Noble Knight as a price reference resource.  Noble Knight does not have the best reputation among all members of these forums for various reasons including inflated prices.  If you want to hear more about this, here's a good place to start:

Noble Knight on Ebay

The eBay "sold listings" check box is often your best friend if you want to get a good idea of what something is worth.  Of course, you have to factor in condition, shipping costs, and a seller's reputation, but it's a whole lot better than Noble Knight in my opinion.


Truth is worth finding and life is too short to work for money.

  

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Post Posted: Mon Sep 21, 2015 9:20 pm 
 

Over the last year obsessively watching 3.5 items on ebay, that particular volume has tended toward the high end. However in the last few months overall 3.5 books on ebay have fallen a bit precipitously. This could change next week.

Lately I've seen that book go for around 30-40USD, a few times its gone for quite a bit lower, especially if bought in a Lot of items, of course.

After reading a bit about NK here I have watched them purposefully manipulate the prices. They will jack the prices on one item or type of item, and radically drop the price on different sets of items, thus driving all other seller prices up or down in response. I have even seen them quadruple a price for an item and then drop it down far below on the same item with only one gradation of difference between the identical items. My only guess is too much playing with lead figures or attempting to scare infrequent buyers into grabbing their cheaper copy.

  

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Post Posted: Tue Sep 22, 2015 10:08 am 
 

aspekt wrote in Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords (D&D 3.5):After reading a bit about NK here I have watched them purposefully manipulate the prices.


For all Noble Knight's problems, it is interesting that they have been in business for a long time.  Most of what they do and sell makes sense and cents.  Here was something I commented on in another thread awhile back.

benjoshua wrote in A new online OOP RPG store:One more thing to consider.  I have often shook my head at the ridiculous prices offered by Noble Knight, and some other sellers, especially on most of their super-rare items.  However, I now wonder whether their approach is not only not insane, but may, if fact, be purposeful and helpful overall to their bottom line.  Here's what might be going on.

I wonder if the price their highly rare items at ridiculous prices serve as bait or window dressing.  Many buyers hear about Orange B3's, woodgrain box sets, or other rarities and search for sellers on the internet with those items.  And since sellers like Noble Knight have these kinds of items in stock, potential buyers visit their web-site.  It can become a win-win situation.  If the buyer actually buys the item, the seller made a killer profit.  If the buyer doesn't buy the item, I suspect many buyers look for something else they can afford and when common items appear at more reasonable prices, then the contrast could lead them to buy one or more cheaper/common selections.  I realize that approach would probably not work well with this more discriminating crowd, but for many buyers, it could serve as an effective business model.  And it's not the kind of thing they'd ever confess.  They just laugh at all the criticism as the money rolls in.

.....


Truth is worth finding and life is too short to work for money.

  
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