AD&D 2nd Edition books
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Post Posted: Sun Jan 15, 2012 4:56 pm 
 

I noticed that AD&D 2nd edition books are not in the Acaeum lists. Are they not of interest to collectors?

I still have two copies of Player's Handbook and one of Dungeon Master's Guide for 2nd edition. One of the PHs is autographed by David "Zeb" Cook, Steve Winter, Mike Breault, and Jeff Easley. Would that make it worth anything to collectors?

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Post Posted: Sun Jan 15, 2012 5:12 pm 
 

Some here collect that stuff, others don't. I'm an avid 2E collector. If I were to guess, I would say most don't collect 2E as aggressively as 1E.

2E hardcovers, like their 1E brethren, don't generally fetch that much on the market. A 2E player's handbook goes for, what, $5-$15? How much someone would be willing to pay would obviously vary.

An autographed, but otherwise unused copy, might add 50 percent to the value.. possibly less.. possibly a lot more. I would think it depends on the person. I personally wouldn't pay a premium for a signature on this book, other than inducing me/justifying me having multiple copies of the thing.

  


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Post Posted: Sun Jan 15, 2012 5:55 pm 
 

I'd be interested to see what thoughts are on autographs adding or not to a value...


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Post Posted: Sun Jan 15, 2012 6:35 pm 
 

ashmire13 wrote:I'd be interested to see what thoughts are on autographs adding or not to a value...

It's been discussed to death.  I'm not even going to bother counting how many threads on the issue there are.

I myself dont care all that much for autographs unless they are accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from the author, artist, etc.  In a lot of cases, an autograph will actually decrease the value of something unless there is a certificate of authenticity.

I have several signed comics and most of them have certificates.  Could I sell them for more than the regular, unsigned comic?  Probably...to the right people.  I also have a comic signed by Jack Kirby without a certificate (doesnt help that the sig is also in pencil).  Could I sell it for more than its worth?  Probably not.

Signatures are easy to fake in a lot of cases.  That is the main reason why I would never buy an autographed item without the certificate, unless of course it was directly from the author or artist.

oldtimer57 wrote:I noticed that AD&D 2nd edition books are not in the Acaeum lists. Are they not of interest to collectors?

From the site FAQ:
Why don't you cover 2nd Edition / 3rd Edition / 4th Edition AD&D material?
and
I know you've said that you don't want to cover (item name) since it was produced after 1990, but I've noticed that it's selling for thousands of dollars on eBay, and I really think you should cover it.

We've chosen to concentrate on 1st Edition (pre-1990) material for a number of reasons.  For one, none of us here collect 2nd-or-later Edition material, so our knowledge about such items is limited.  While we may consider covering selected later items at some point in the future, our current workload will keep us busy for quite a while.  Secondly, the site's main purpose is not to be a collectibles price guide, but to provide information on what constitutes a first (or early) print of an item.  It is VERY unusual for any TSR item produced after 1990 to have different, distinguishable printings -- or to have a small print run.  By 1990, TSR was a sizeable publisher, cranking out professional-quality products on big presses.  Contrast to the early 70's, when Gygax and friends were hand-boxing the game in their living rooms.  If an item produced after 1990 is selling for lots of money, it's generally NOT because it had a small print run, nor that it's a rare first print of an item -- it's because the item is popular.  If we covered it, it would simply be to show a cover scan of the item, and give our opinion on its worth.  That sort of coverage is absolutely useless, because YOU could just as easily look on eBay at any given time and get an even more accurate guess of the item's worth.

The Acaeum Wiki is not directly affiliated with The Acaeum, though it's managed by several of our forum members; check there for D&D items later than First Edition or produced by companies other than TSR, or for other roleplaying systems entirely.


There are people that collect 2E and other editions, but it wasnt the focus of the site early on.


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Post Posted: Sun Jan 15, 2012 7:22 pm 
 

I suppose I should read FAQ:s more. :-)

Kingofpain89 wrote:That is the main reason why I would never buy an autographed item without the certificate,

I have no idea how to get a certificate of authenticity. From where would a get such a certificate?

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Post Posted: Sun Jan 15, 2012 8:01 pm 
 

oldtimer57 wrote:I have no idea how to get a certificate of authenticity. From where would a get such a certificate?

You wouldnt normally get something like this at a convention or store waiting in line with everyone else to get your books signed.  You usually see this in auctions or when the author/artist sells something of a limited nature with his or her signature on it (thats the way its happened with my stuff anyway).

If you have say, a book signed by Stephen King from twenty years ago, I seriously doubt calling him up and asking for a certificate of authenticity is going to work.  :)


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Post Posted: Sun Jan 15, 2012 8:14 pm 
 

Kingofpain89 wrote:You wouldnt normally get something like this at a convention or store waiting in line with everyone else to get your books signed.  You usually see this in auctions or when the author/artist sells something of a limited nature with his or her signature on it (thats the way its happened with my stuff anyway).

If you have say, a book signed by Stephen King from twenty years ago, I seriously doubt calling him up and asking for a certificate of authenticity is going to work.  :)


What?!  Authors, artists, and publishers do not carry around pre-made stacks of signature authencity paperwork for just such occasions?


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Post Posted: Sun Jan 15, 2012 8:48 pm 
 

Most 1st edition hardcovers don't sell for much either.  Lots more prints in 2nd edition it seems.

Some collectors want signatures others don't.  Usually the signature must be from someone of consequence to improve the value of the item.

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Post Posted: Sun Jan 15, 2012 8:58 pm 
 

I happen to be one of those who prefer my collectable items to remain free of signatures.... mostly.

That said, I happily chase folks and pretty much hound them during the NTRPGCons to get them to put something in the little Brown Convention History Journal. :lol:

And I have asked authors to sign modules they have produced as well.
But never one of the older rare ones.


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Post Posted: Mon Jan 16, 2012 12:08 am 
 

I agree - I think signatures are more done out of commemoration, and not collectability in mind. I would think signatures on older rare items are the kiss of death for most collectors. I only considered Roslof signing a B3 for about 5 seconds. I think signatures will have far more value to the seller than the buyer, in general.

  
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