Wilderlands Books Series - a very good Judges Guild resource
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Post Posted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 8:05 am 
 

Most well seasoned Judges Guild collectors (Even newbies) know about the most sought after Wilderlands playing aids like the City State sets (CSIO and CSWE) and the Wilderlands Sets too, each of which included at least 4 large brown two sided maps (Counting Judges and Players copies).

But not as many of us pay much attention to some other less well-known products that Judges Guild produced for the Wilderlands.

The Wilderlands Series Books are a set of five separate playing aids (Books), which map in greater detail certain areas of the wilderness surrounding the City State of the Invincible Overlord.
All five of these books use the Campaign Hexagon System and the Wilderlands Campaign Map One.

Each book contains about 25 Five Mile Hexes (some more, some less) taken from various areas surrounding the City State of the Invisible Overlord with hex maps included inside each book.
All maps covered by each book are included inside the book, and none of the books had separate maps.
It was assumed that you already have a copy of Campaign Map One, although that map is not needed to insert the data in the books into a larger campaign or as a stand alone adventure set.

The books contain details of those hexes, including at least 1 adventure scenario (most have 2 or more).
Also included are details for the towns, cities, or villages inside the region of the detailed hexes, with gobs of information on major NPCs and monsters too (including Lairs, or dungeons).

These books offer a lot of adventuring for a harried DM looking for a quick adventure for the group.
As a combined City State Campaign they are awesome and easy to use as ALL of them take place inside the area covered by that single Campaign Map...
Like most other Judges Guild products, these books are very easy to use, and easy to insert into any campaign scenario as side adventures, or even as a part of your larger campaign.
These can also be inserted into other systems with a bit of tweaking by the DM ahead of time.

Mines of Custalcon (111) Wilderlands Book One.

Spies of Lightelf (270) Wilderlands Book Two.

Shield Maidens of Sea Rune (1010) Wilderlands Book Three.

Pirates of Hagrost (1020) Wilderlands Book Four.

Witches Court Marshes (1090) Wilderlands Book Five.

Many of you have one or more of these books in your collection, but have you read them and have you used them?
If not then give them a read.
Try one out in your campaigns or even in pickup games.
If you do not have any I highly recommend that you look for one of them (any of the five will do as a start).

Each of these books can commonly be found for sale on E-Bay for less than $10 (though Witches Court Marshes is sometimes listed higher than the others and I have no idea why).
Despite the low cost for these books, they offer so much for your adventuring needs.


"Guys, I am starting to think Tegel Manor might be haunted..."
Stated by me as a PC during a run of Tegel Manor DMed by killjoy at NTRPGCon 2010

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Last edited by Gnat the Beggar on Mon Feb 08, 2016 1:41 am, edited 1 time in total.
  


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Post Posted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 10:56 pm 
 

Seems like JG was trying to expand on the CSIO model in its later years: lots & lots & lots of intricately crafted detail. I'd add Wraith Overlord to the list, in the city rather than in the wilderness per se, but a similarly intricate expansion of the JG world.

These books had main missions for the PCs & such, but taken together made a world where the characters could strike out in any direction. It's an idea that would eventually require servers running MMPOGs, MOWs, & even MOMRPGs, a pre-digital Google Earth. You could port it all to a modern database format, but I think something is lost when you can't actually see how complex it all is. The CSIO map is a mind-blowing work by itself -how could such so much detail exist about a place that doesn't exist? Trippy.

Unfortunately I think this approach led to works of much lesser merit by others. When the Clash & the Sex Pistols played like they didn't care how they sounded, it inspired a generation of mediocre artists whose product was just plain non-ironic bad. JG's classics led to the widespread practice of packing every possible side-note & rules addendum into everything, which after a few decades of bloat gives us The Worlds Largest Dungeon. Chaosium RQ's Griffin Mountain excepted of course (same early-80s vintage, same basic idea).

  

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Post Posted: Thu Mar 10, 2011 12:04 am 
 

And lets not forget the Pegasus Magazine.
Each of those magazines, inlcuded dozens of pages of new data about the City State and the surrounding Wilderness.


"Guys, I am starting to think Tegel Manor might be haunted..."
Stated by me as a PC during a run of Tegel Manor DMed by killjoy at NTRPGCon 2010

Charter Member of the ATM

  
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