What does the future hold?
Post new topic Reply to topic Page 1 of 1
Author


Prolific Collector

Posts: 341
Joined: May 18, 2008
Last Visit: Aug 03, 2008

Post Posted: Fri May 23, 2008 2:57 pm 
 

I think the first thing I saw was a copy of Eldritch Wizardry, and I was hooked. I had to wait for the  1st boxed set to come out and when it did there weren't any freakin' dice! Just chits. It's hard to describe how cool it felt getting that first set of weird dice, 4 siders, 12 siders, 8's and of course the all important d20. I know we wore them down pretty quick. the tip of the 4 sided, that dangerous little plastic caltrop, and the 8 sider, and the 12 got so rounded it could only roll two numbers. I remember my Mom cutting out the article on the evils of D&D, I wish I'd kept it.

So what is next? What is coming out or has come out that will be the woodgrain box, or the gencon tournament copies, or even the more mundane but sought after Dark Tower or Tegal Manor?

I just popped open a copy of Descent I picked up off of ebay for a pretty sweet price and I have to say, man, todays gamers have it good. I don't even care what the system is like, the parts are so good looking it doesn't matter. I keep coming across high quality boxed games, things that put the old Game Workshop stuff to shame. I know there is more, but I think these are part of what will be tomorrows treasures. Some wargames, I get into GBoH from GMT, Panzer Grenadier from Avalanche, and the Band of Heroes from Lock'n Load, but other stuff coming out right now from FFG seems unbelievably cool, Descent, Doom, Starcraft, Tide of Iron, these are the beginnings of memories. I know somewhere some kid is eyeing the monster box of Descent the way I eyed that first blue rulebook and light green B1. Or seeing the AD&D DMG for the first time or the Players Handbook and instantly working up a lizardman adventure...

What else is out there... what does the future hold.

  

User avatar

Grandstanding Collector

Posts: 8219
Joined: Jan 21, 2005
Last Visit: Jun 12, 2017
Location: Wallasey, Merseyside, UK

Post Posted: Fri May 23, 2008 4:52 pm 
 

video game D&D?



  

User avatar

Sage Collector

Posts: 2737
Joined: May 31, 2007
Last Visit: Mar 22, 2021

Post Posted: Sat May 24, 2008 12:24 am 
 

Descent blows compared to Warhammer Quest. The miniatures for WHQ are vastly superior, and the game play much cleaner, and more immersive - it can actually be a roleplaying game aside from the board game. So, no, today's gamers have it far worse - they have to be handheld and coddled. They've had their imaginations emasculated in many ways. All that great graphics has stolen their ability to see with their eyes shut, and the linear, repetitive nature of what they do play has forced them into save mode tabletopping, if they can even do it... so, what is coming? Hopefully something that shatters the status quo. I have hopes for some products, but I am not sure the new generation can be "saved."


Those who can, don't. Those who should not, do.

  

User avatar

Prolific Collector

Posts: 260
Joined: Feb 25, 2003
Last Visit: Jan 10, 2021

Post Posted: Sat May 24, 2008 12:58 am 
 

I'm convinced we'll see a return to the basics. You see it throughout human history in many facets. Things get really complex and then we rebel against the complexity and simplify. There's already a rising tide in more people playing old school games. I think we'll see a new generation of DTP published games from people. There will be a second coming.

  


Prolific Collector

Posts: 108
Joined: Nov 29, 2002
Last Visit: Apr 12, 2021
Location: Seattle, WA

Post Posted: Sat May 24, 2008 6:10 am 
 

Jason:

Do you ever get down to Days of Knights in Newark?  I used to play there back in 80-82 when I was at U of Delaware.

  


Prolific Collector

Posts: 341
Joined: May 18, 2008
Last Visit: Aug 03, 2008

Post Posted: Sat May 24, 2008 7:03 am 
 

serleran wrote:Descent blows compared to Warhammer Quest. The miniatures for WHQ are vastly superior, and the game play much cleaner, and more immersive - it can actually be a roleplaying game aside from the board game. So, no, today's gamers have it far worse - they have to be handheld and coddled. They've had their imaginations emasculated in many ways. All that great graphics has stolen their ability to see with their eyes shut, and the linear, repetitive nature of what they do play has forced them into save mode tabletopping, if they can even do it... so, what is coming? Hopefully something that shatters the status quo. I have hopes for some products, but I am not sure the new generation can be "saved."


My that is gloomy. The molds for Warhammer Quest were cool, though the relentless grey hard plastic was uninspiring to a non-painter. The mini's in Descent are more appealing to me.

Todays gamers do have a handicap. Too much has been done. I was lucky enough to be in highschool when D&D first appreared and was presented with a bare bones game system with little or no prewritten material to draw upon. I had to use my imagination or die, or at least not have anything ready for the players when we got together to play.  

But I do not agree with the principal Skinner philosophy ("These children have no future"). Primarily games are about inspiring imagination and a game like Descent does that, even if the rules aren't great. A bad rule system can inspire a creative mind to make better rules. I know that the blue D&D rulebook out of that first boxed set only had spells and charts for the 1st few levels of experience. We had to make our own after that and we did, which is what helped to make D&D such an incredible experience. Todays gamers have to wade through the mire of terrible, bad, okay, good and even fantastic material. They'd be better off starting just with their own imagination, but I have no doubt that their imagination will win out. For me a game like Descent instantly capture my imagination and inspires me. After 30+ years of gaming that impresses me.

What games inspire you today? Modules, game systems, boardgames?

Descent for me, from what I have seen of it, Tide of Iron, etc... I'm impressed by the new FFG releases. What about pen and paper? Any new modules or games systems? Any hidden gems?

  


Prolific Collector

Posts: 341
Joined: May 18, 2008
Last Visit: Aug 03, 2008

Post Posted: Sat May 24, 2008 7:13 am 
 

ddt58 wrote:Jason:

Do you ever get down to Days of Knights in Newark?  I used to play there back in 80-82 when I was at U of Delaware.


I used to go all the time but I moved to Cincinnati awhile back and when I returned I was in terrible health. Right now I'm tutoring math and I'm enrolled in classes to become a math teacher and just haven't gotten out to Newark in a long, long time.

Thery've moved a couple of times since '82 and had a wonderful boardgame group for Euro games. Their backroom. they have part of one of the two story brick buildings down near the start of main street, was always bustling, though the Clix gamers and 3E players dominated the weekly activities. I need to get back down there (though the summer semester starts next week and I already have two students and night classes of my own) so I'll probably put it off till I see how much time I'm going to have. I've never been able to walk into that store without seeing a couple of hours disappear before I get out again.

  


Prolific Collector

Posts: 341
Joined: May 18, 2008
Last Visit: Aug 03, 2008

Post Posted: Sat May 24, 2008 7:22 am 
 

Busman wrote:I'm convinced we'll see a return to the basics. You see it throughout human history in many facets. Things get really complex and then we rebel against the complexity and simplify. There's already a rising tide in more people playing old school games. I think we'll see a new generation of DTP published games from people. There will be a second coming.


I hope so. I never got into the style of 2nd edition play. It went in a different direction than I'd hoped. I also didn't like the slick professional feel of AD&D once it became successful. Judges Guild's Dark Tower, the style of the early Dragon Mags and monochrome modules, ink sketches rather than full color ilustrations. Rough paper, black & white, like Pegasus or the Dungeoneer, I find those much more appealing. And game systems and campaigns that offer a skeleton for a creative mind to flesh out. I'd like to see RPGs stress and instruct on role-playing with a solid dice and card based combat system to hold the roleplaying up. I hope Arthur wakens from his sleep and hears the cries of his people waiting for their hero-king to come again and lead them to glory.

  

User avatar

Sage Collector

Posts: 2737
Joined: May 31, 2007
Last Visit: Mar 22, 2021

Post Posted: Sat May 24, 2008 9:56 am 
 

The thing I dislike about Descent, aside from its ho-hum mechanics and lackluster miniatures (I don't find them all that appealing - and, they are identical in every FFG release, from Runebound onward, with a very few minor additions) is quite simply: it does nothing new, at all. I like innovation, revolution, and evolution - Descent has none of these. It is a weaker, more expensive Warhammer Quest without the playability. But, this is my opinion, and I base it off of how fun it is, to me, to use -- I will admit some of the miniatures are nice looking, but I'll take those old GW plastics over any of the plastics today (though Citadel still does awesome work.)

What games inspire you today?


I really like Zombies!!! (and the pseudo-expansion/alteration Mid-Evil,) Runebound (yes, I like FFG - just not Descent), Adventurer the Card Game, Carcassone (I think I spelled that right,) Shadows over Camelot, Hex Hex, and Talisman 4e. That's about it of the new board games that I play these days. Of course, I'm not so much into over types of games (not a fan of Axis and Allies or Risk, so those might be cool - just not for me.)

What about pen and paper? Any new modules or games systems? Any hidden gems?


Castles and Crusades, while not wholly unique, does exactly what it set out to do (and the fact I write for it doesn't hurt, I guess.) I also like Castle Whiterock and the upcoming Castle Zagyg. As for non-D&D-like systems: The Pool is interesting, and so is The Window. Risus has potential, but these are all "Forge" games, so they have limited use (to me.) It is virtually impossible in my area to find anything not d20 in a hobby store, and I don't buy anything with that label (except Castle Whiterock.)

So, really, I think this is just a matter of preference in game, and not a real disagreement. :)


Those who can, don't. Those who should not, do.

  

User avatar

Grandstanding Collector
Acaeum Donor

Posts: 7949
Joined: Jun 23, 2003
Last Visit: Apr 11, 2021
Location: DFW TX

Post Posted: Sat May 24, 2008 11:40 am 
 

JZavoda wrote:
My that is gloomy. The molds for Warhammer Quest were cool, though the relentless grey hard plastic was uninspiring to a non-painter. The mini's in Descent are more appealing to me.

Todays gamers do have a handicap. Too much has been done. I was lucky enough to be in highschool when D&D first appreared and was presented with a bare bones game system with little or no prewritten material to draw upon. I had to use my imagination or die, or at least not have anything ready for the players when we got together to play.  

But I do not agree with the principal Skinner philosophy ("These children have no future"). Primarily games are about inspiring imagination and a game like Descent does that, even if the rules aren't great. A bad rule system can inspire a creative mind to make better rules. I know that the blue D&D rulebook out of that first boxed set only had spells and charts for the 1st few levels of experience. We had to make our own after that and we did, which is what helped to make D&D such an incredible experience. Todays gamers have to wade through the mire of terrible, bad, okay, good and even fantastic material. They'd be better off starting just with their own imagination, but I have no doubt that their imagination will win out. For me a game like Descent instantly capture my imagination and inspires me. After 30+ years of gaming that impresses me.

What games inspire you today? Modules, game systems, boardgames?

Descent for me, from what I have seen of it, Tide of Iron, etc... I'm impressed by the new FFG releases. What about pen and paper? Any new modules or games systems? Any hidden gems?


I think we've house gamed every single board game we ever played.  My four year old grandson is fascinated by the TSR oldie Warlocks and Warriors and we've both already houseruled the heck out of it to make it more fun. I think games like Descent and Runebound look cool, and I have no doubt we will house rule that to death also to make them play "better", or more as we like them.

Jason you are right with one thing, back in the old days we didn't have to swim through so much dreck to get to the good stuff, I feel bad for the RPG gamer that has to wade through so much waste.  Luckily some good products do exist that can inspire, but it may be harder than ever to find them!  Castles and Crusades is a GREAT system to start someone out on, it has the simplicity of early D&D with a few added twists to make it more interesting and playable.  Serelan is right it does exactly what it sets out to do.

I don't think there is anything unique here but I think Castle Whiterock could be quite inspiring to a beginning DM or player. If this had come out 25 years ago we as gamers would have cults dedicated to something like this, it's every thing we wanted the original Castle Greyhawk to be, namely a double digit level ruin exploration. Like I said nothing really new here but I can see if I was a newbie just looking at the box and maps would get me excited.  The same thing did happen to me when I opened Ed Greenwood's Ruins of Undermountain and saw all those gigantic poster maps, and thought about all the cool creatures and adventures I could put within! Night Below had a similar but smaller effect on me.  I can't really think of anything else since then that has really fired me up enough to want to immediately run an adventure.  Old School wise T1-4 hit me like that, as did the original D1 when it came out (seeing that gigantic underdark map with only a few encounter spots filled in!!!).   Sometimes when I see a particular Goodman games cover by Otus I get that twinge a bit, but the thought of having to convert eveyrthing to 2E immediately damps my enthusiasm.  

Maybe someday I'll work Castle Whiterock over and make it playable but truthfully it would just be easier to run T1-4 or Ruins of Undermountain or even Night Below again since these are already in a playable format.  So I guess I'm still waiting for the post 1999 product that will get me so excited I will just have to sit down and run a session even if it means a lot of work on my part converting it.....

Mike B.


"THE MORE YOU THINK ABOUT WHY i DONE WHAT i DONE THE MORE i LAUGH" Cougar
"The Acaeum hates fun" Sir Allen
"I had a collecting emergency" Nogrod
Co-founder of the North Texas RPG Con
http://www.ntrpgcon.com

 WWW  

User avatar

Grandstanding Collector
Acaeum Donor

Posts: 7949
Joined: Jun 23, 2003
Last Visit: Apr 11, 2021
Location: DFW TX

Post Posted: Sat May 24, 2008 11:47 am 
 

I did forget one thing, I have always enjoyed Dungeon magazine because to my mind all the really good 2E adventures were published here and not as modules (excepting perhaps Night Below and Firestorm Mountain).  Adventures like Shards of Night, Tomb of the Mud Sorceror and especially Kingdom of the Ghouls by Wolfgang Baur brought back that old feeling of "Gotta run this!" that I had been missing for awhile. Any of these three and probably more I've forgotten would have been miles better than pretty much anything "officially" published during 1990-2000.  Through the years I still buy Dungeon and sometimes look at the adventures, but except for the adventure path stuff I don't feel that inspired.

OH and forgot Pathfinder series, I think it's very well done and I think a beginning DM might get really inspired by the subject matter.

Also kudos to I1 Forbidden City, when I first saw that many years ago, all the possibilities of the ruined city really got my creative juices flowing!  Something like that, perhaps a ruined city sitting on top of a hidden plateau in a jungle, one with very heavy Burroughs/Howard/Haggard overtones, would get me excited even if it was 3/3.5/4 edition if it was well done and had cool maps.

Mike B.

Mike B.


"THE MORE YOU THINK ABOUT WHY i DONE WHAT i DONE THE MORE i LAUGH" Cougar
"The Acaeum hates fun" Sir Allen
"I had a collecting emergency" Nogrod
Co-founder of the North Texas RPG Con
http://www.ntrpgcon.com

 WWW  


Prolific Collector

Posts: 122
Joined: Nov 29, 2006
Last Visit: Aug 07, 2013

Post Posted: Tue Jun 10, 2008 1:19 am 
 

What games inspire you today? Modules, game systems, boardgames?

I think at this point it would be rediscovering some of the little gems published in early White Dwarf magazines back in the day.  So many odd and unusual things that seem to fit so well with the Wilderlands setting that I will most likely start incorporating some of them when I start back playing once again.  Ahhh ... for the good old days ... nostalgia rears up once more ...

 YIM  

User avatar

Grandstanding Collector
Acaeum Donor

Posts: 6720
Joined: Jul 16, 2005
Last Visit: Feb 02, 2021

Post Posted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 1:30 am 
 

I get inspired by several games out there.

First, the Pathfinder materials from Paizo are excellent.

I cannot gush about The Skinsaw Murders enough.  This was a really really good evocation of the horror genre in D&D.  And the horror was quite convincing...something D&D scenarios often fail to accomplish.

Fortress of the Stone Giants, by the classic writer, Wolfgang Bauer, was another in the giant saga tradition.  Intentionally written in the mode of the giant G1-3 modules of old, it was just...slightly...too setting specific, but still, rather good.

Anything by Mongoose for the Stormbringer/Hawkmoon settings is excellent.  I love the artwork associated with Moorcock's work, if nothing else.

Now that what I think of as "The British School" of fantasy art has pretty much taken over, the older Warhammer products now look much less strange.  I am getting interested in the old Warhammer Fantasy Roleplaying publications...of course, now that I said that they will jump 5x in cost.

The other day, I visited my storage space...where floods forced me to store the bulk of my game collection last year.  Opening up the bins, I got the same old rush you get when you spot a module or game book poking out of the pile at a second hand store....even though I knew it was all already mine.  And what was on top?  Ironhoof Highlands, followed by layer upon layer of Judges Guild goodness!

I pulled out a copy of The Illheidrin Book, because I found that Alcastra's earthwork fortress was perfect for the keep of a wizard on the borderlands of my current campaign.  Of course, it had to be redrawn to modern standards, but the cover art of a wierd, naked sorceress will be a handy visual to fire the blood of my campaign's barbarian warrior PCs.  Booyah!

After last week's chatter about classic Dungeon modules I looked up a copy of Kingdom of the Ghouls...also by Wolfgang Bauer...from #70.  My players don't have much interest in the underdark...they hate it, in fact...but I am planning to loot it for ideas to seed the ghoul-haunted fens beyond the Danube limes.

I now have a copy of Tarracina Port...the goofy brilliant work of Kent Krumvieda.  It takes me back to the old days of high school when we were smart kids with very little actual knowledge about the world.

And who could game in the modern world without handy pdf files from ace companies like 0one Games (Blueprint series maps are cheap and generally superb!) or the 3.5 SRD set from Creative Mountain Games?  RPGNow and DriveThruRPG are great storehouses of gaming ideas.

Much fun, actually.  :D


"But I have watched the dragons come, fire-eyed, across the world."

  
Post new topic Reply to topic Page 1 of 1