Good starting points for Cthulhu?
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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 10:45 am 
 

simonmwh wrote:  Glens are not English.


:lol:

In the sense that Scotland is not England and that England and Scotland are not Ireland and that England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales make up the United Kingdom...no, glens are not English.

You would have to forgive an American writer for not knowing the linguistic roots and variations of the British Isles.  Who, exactly, are the Scotch-Irish and the Scoti and the Scots, and the Irish and the Picts and how are they related to the Celts and the Gauls and the Cornish, Welsh, Cymry, Britons, Bretons and Celto-Roman Iberians?  :lol:  

Or, that Douglas, Douglass and Dougal are all indigenous names typical of Ireland and Scotland...but that they mean "dark foreigner," as in someone who is not from Scotland or Ireland?  :D

I suspect that there might be similar linguistic confusion if we polled random citizens of London about the word "glen."

It gets even more confusing for American readers when Europeans insist on mixing geographic designators, such as the habit of refering to mountainous areas as forests...for example, the German Black Forest which is a forest but is more correctly a mountain range.  Or the British use of "wold," which means "forest" but which is most often used to describe a range of hills.  

For instance, what is "The Wold" and how is it different from "The Cotswolds?"

Well...that was fun.  OK...go on with the discussion.  :D


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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 2:29 pm 
 

What if, for instance, a UK publisher confused something typical from one US state and another that was common knowledge to somebody from one of those states.  Surely you would expect this common knowledge to be accurate?  If it was a slight variation in a phrase then so be it but a 'glen' is a reasonably common word, especially north of the border, and none existent south.  If you are selling a product in a country don't you get  a resident to proof read it first?  It just seems like Goodman are 'cocking their snoots' at us.  I use 'us' as I'm sure the Scots don't want their glens to be relocated down here.  Just seems lazy not to check.  

As for forests.....they all used to be but were chopped down to fuel the Industrial Revolution. I suppose once something has a name then it sticks.  As for the Wold I have never heard of it.  I live just south of the Weald though.

I think if you polled the random, educated, citizens of London they would know where to find glens.  Isn't it the educated part of the populus that CoC is aimed at? :?:

  

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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 3:01 pm 
 

simonmwh wrote: Isn't it the educated part of the populus that CoC is aimed at? :?:


Good point.


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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 3:05 pm 
 

FormCritic wrote:
You would have to forgive an American writer for not knowing the linguistic roots and variations of the British Isles.  Who, exactly, are the Scotch-Irish and the Scoti and the Scots, and the Irish and the Picts and how are they related to the Celts and the Gauls and the Cornish, Welsh, Cymry, Britons, Bretons and Celto-Roman Iberians?  :lol:  



Surely the point of being a writer in any form is to research your subject and get details correct? There is a depth to the nuances of the English (or British) language that is not realised or understood by others.

The same could be said of 'American' english and its difference to english.

Does that make it incorrect, or just different?  :?  

But, I'd think to say that an American writer wouldn't know about something like this is a little condescending.

So, I'd say to call anything a glen in England is inviting Mr Cock-up to the party.  

:lol:


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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 3:16 pm 
 

ashmire13 wrote:  

But, I'd think to say that an American writer wouldn't know about something like this is a little condescending.

So, I'd say to call anything a glen in England is inviting Mr Cock-up to the party.  

:lol:


An American writer probably wouldn't know about the word "glen" not being applicable to England.


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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 3:23 pm 
 

Especially given that, in American English, any word that can describe anything is usually acceptable usage. So, a copse might be a glen which might be a forest which might be a hill which might be a burg... even more true if it is being used "artistically." Though, that is a no-no in RPG writing, it seems.


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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 3:39 pm 
 

Just stumbled accross a book called green and pleasant lands with a picture og a cricket all on trhe cover, and another kind of flip book with two adventures in it and cut out shits in the middle. Both by Games Workshops probably from the 80's or so. Don't know anything about Cthulhu. Is there a Cthulhu Acaeum type of site with price guides on it?


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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 4:11 pm 
 

mbassoc2003 wrote:Just stumbled accross a book called green and pleasant lands with a picture og a cricket all on trhe cover, and another kind of flip book with two adventures in it and cut out shits in the middle. Both by Games Workshops probably from the 80's or so. Don't know anything about Cthulhu. Is there a Cthulhu Acaeum type of site with price guides on it?


I was watching a few of those 'Green & Pleasant Lands' last year and they were selling for 10's of ££. From memory anything up to £50 IIRC...


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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 4:22 pm 
 

mbassoc2003 wrote:Is there a Cthulhu Acaeum type of site with price guides on it?


Not really.  The prices at yog-sothoth.com are about three years old.


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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 4:32 pm 
 

TheHistorian wrote:The prices at yog-sothoth.com are about three years old.

Just like here then.  :D
I'll probably just stick them up on eBay on open auction. I've never really appreciated CoC or MERPS. I spent the day looking through the stockrooms of my LGS, and didn;t realise how little I know anout what's worth buying and what's not outside of my own very limited scope of experience. I picked these two up along with a stack of FR and Greyhawk 2E sourcebooks, none of which I know anything about ATM.
Did knock back a box of 3.5E Spell Compendiums, in favour of a box of Rules Compendiums, which I may live to regret. Spell Compendium seems to be worth more than Rules Compendium.


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Last edited by mbassoc2003 on Mon Oct 05, 2009 4:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 4:33 pm 
 

I think this sums up CoC gamers



http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Cthulhu-Grave-Rub ... 286.c0.m14



8O  8O

  


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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 4:42 pm 
 

How bizarre!  8O


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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 4:54 pm 
 

Lovecraft's grave at the Swan Point Cemetery in Providence is a well known tourist destination.
http://www.roadsideamerica.com/tip/9343


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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 6:09 pm 
 

simonmwh wrote:I think this sums up CoC gamers


** expired eBay auction **


8O  8O




A rubbing of a grave marker is common practice among people who engage in such things as historical research, family history or even just collectors of interesting headstones.



I could imagine a situation where someone would take so many rubbings of a headstone that it would risk damaging the stone...but that is what they do.


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Post Posted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 6:10 pm 
 

ashmire13 wrote:
I was watching a few of those 'Green & Pleasant Lands' last year and they were selling for 10's of ££. From memory anything up to £50 IIRC...


Blake again.  He's always cropping up.  8O


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Post Posted: Tue Oct 06, 2009 1:25 am 
 

Can only assume this is heavily over priced...



http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Call-of-Cthulhu-G ... .m63.l1177



Just picked up this and it's sister publication in brand new mint condition cheap. I'll see if I can get a title for the flip book.


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Post Posted: Tue Oct 06, 2009 4:00 am 
 

FormCritic wrote:
A rubbing of a grave marker is common practice among people who engage in such things as historical research, family history or even just collectors of interesting headstones.



I used to work near St Martins in the Fields Church off Trafalgar Square where they even run courses on grave rubbing; or at least did a couple of years ago.  
Considering that I had never seen a grave rubbing for sale on ebay before it didn't surprise me that the first one I came across is from the grave of HP Lovecraft.

  


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Post Posted: Tue Oct 06, 2009 7:16 am 
 

mbassoc2003 wrote:Can only assume this is heavily over priced...


** expired eBay auction **


Just picked up this and it's sister publication in brand new mint condition cheap. I'll see if I can get a title for the flip book.




Certainly very top end from what I can recall them going for last year. Optimistic, but that doesn't say it won't go for that price...



I'm sure that one went for £50ish last year and others were going for £20-30 regularly.


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