Wee Warriors product list
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Post Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2006 11:01 pm 
 

That's really nice work, a distinctive style with an old skool flair.  
Are you interested in selling any of your old work?

  


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Post Posted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 12:48 am 
 

Well, so it DID get used eventualy (the cover on A&E 34).  I'm not crazy about that composition but I do like the way I set up the fight, with the one guy trying to trip the warrior while the other one bashes him from the side.  I think he was about to go boom there.

If you're asking whether I have the originals to the work that was published in The Dragon, no, I don't think I do.  I know I had the Mythos and Logos cover for a long time, but not any more.

Of those scan I posted, the last two were a couple of the otherwise unpublished ones.

As for "Oh, and was the 'Mythos and Logos' cover (TD #6) pretty much your only published color work? ", it was the only full color work I did under the Morno signature that was printed.  For the last things I did for Arduin, in 1980, I used a bizarre color process that involved lots of grey markers and a color wheel.  You didn't really know what the color version looked like till you saw it in print - you knew you wanted 10% cyan, 40% magenta, and so on, so you drew the seps on different pages, using a 10% grey marker on one, and a 40% grey marker on the other, and so on.

Color separations very very expensive back then, so most small press work was one color, maybe two.

I don't guess I was getting much work printed in full color till about 1986, when costs had started coming down.


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Post Posted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 12:50 am 
 

VermilionFire wrote:That's really nice work, a distinctive style with an old skool flair.  
Are you interested in selling any of your old work?


I can only think of one original I have with the Morno signature, an ink and watercolor piece of Frodo at the Grey Havens.  Most of the older originals I have are from a few years later, between 1983 and 1987 or so, when I think my work had come a long way, but it's more straight up medieval than D&D, and so isn't likely to be of as much interest here.

Edit:  on the other hand, I've already discovered I had some things I thought were lost, so till I unpack the spare room I guess I won't really be sure :).


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Post Posted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 3:43 am 
 

You did that quality of work in your teens?

What are you creating now?


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Post Posted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 7:14 am 
 

MShipley88 wrote:You did that quality of work in your teens?

What are you creating now?


Mostly this:  http://shop.webomator.com/


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Post Posted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 10:01 am 
 

hi brad!

Just wanted to say how much I love your site. It is very slick and cool looking. How do you create your new work? Is it all digital?


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Post Posted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 10:59 am 
 

scribe wrote:hi brad!

Just wanted to say how much I love your site. It is very slick and cool looking. How do you create your new work? Is it all digital?


Almost all; some of the Celtic knotwork designs get their start on paper, but otherwise it's pretty much digital from start to finish.


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Post Posted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 7:48 pm 
 

I really like your website.

For me, the Morno style epitomized Arduin and the feel of many of the second party gaming publications of the era.

I never suspected that it was the work of someone my own age.

One thing that impresses me is the generally realistic portrayal of weapons and armor.  For instance in the drawing above, titled Into the Place of Mystery, the two figures are carrying weapons that could have been wielded by real medieval characters.

So many of the artists out there never seem to have seen a real weapon or suit of armor...and seem to have no idea how these weapons were used, carried or held.  (See my complaints about A Paladin In Hell, carrying his shield upside down.)

How did you acquire this level of knowledge about the details of weapons and armor when you were a teenager?

Mark   8)


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Post Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 12:12 am 
 

Formerly Known As Morno wrote:
I can only think of one original I have with the Morno signature, an ink and watercolor piece of Frodo at the Grey Havens.  Most of the older originals I have are from a few years later, between 1983 and 1987 or so, when I think my work had come a long way, but it's more straight up medieval than D&D, and so isn't likely to be of as much interest here.

Edit:  on the other hand, I've already discovered I had some things I thought were lost, so till I unpack the spare room I guess I won't really be sure :).


Just do us a favor and make some of this stuff available outside of GenCon....where more than 5% of us can take a stab at owning one with a bid!  :lol:

And yes, I am interested in anything Morno so count me as interested in the later work as well.


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Post Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 12:57 pm 
 

MShipley88 wrote:One thing that impresses me is the generally realistic portrayal of weapons and armor.  For instance in the drawing above, titled Into the Place of Mystery, the two figures are carrying weapons that could have been wielded by real medieval characters.

So many of the artists out there never seem to have seen a real weapon or suit of armor...and seem to have no idea how these weapons were used, carried or held.  (See my complaints about A Paladin In Hell, carrying his shield upside down.)

How did you acquire this level of knowledge about the details of weapons and armor when you were a teenager?


There are an awful lot of people making fantasy art who have only ever looked at other fantasy art, so their ideas about what things should look like are pretty skewed.  The same's true of writers, who in many cases have never even considered how people actually lived in a medieval or ancient society and apparently don't even wonder about it; and in movies, where you frequently see people using shields only as a sort of counterweight for their roundhouse swipes with a sword.

There's no real secret to it - Id been interested in history and mythology for at least as long as I'd been interested in fantasy, and it was only natural to base the fantasy on things that actually had worked for people who lived in a similar way.  There's a reason all good boats look the way they do, and for the same reason, edged weapons look a certain way.  These are objects whose designs were honed (you should forgive the expression) over thousands of years of actual use.

You don't find historical swords with giant spikes sticking out of them, and it's not rocket science to figure out why.  You just have to give a damn.

In my early teens I'd been especialy impressed with Seamus Cullen's book "Armor" - its illustrations are terrific.  And if you'd started talking about King Arthur I'd have assumed you were talking about late Roman Britain.  Tolkien based his work on his knowledge of actual people's lives and beliefs, even though he took all of that knowledge into uncharted territory, and the art ought to do the same thing.

In that vein Alan Lee, who is a demigod, and John Howe are a gigantic leap past those Hildebrandt Brothers calendars we all had back in the day.


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Post Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 12:59 pm 
 

scribe wrote:

Just do us a favor and make some of this stuff available outside of GenCon....where more than 5% of us can take a stab at owning one with a bid!  :lol:

And yes, I am interested in anything Morno so count me as interested in the later work as well.


Well, if I can figure out what to do about that, I'll see what I can manage :).  It's just that those drawings and painting from the 80's don't have the Morno signature, since I stopped using it around the end of '78.  I do have the one I mentioned above that is a "Morno" piece, and I'll see if there are others.


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Post Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 2:35 pm 
 

So, did you, like, kill Morno?  Can you never revive Morno again?  Seriously...not being sarcastic...if you did not sign something in 1978 does that mean that Morno did not draw it?  

If I had a D'Vinci painting I wouldn't care that the artist only signed it 30 years after he painted it.  That, in fact, would be a part of the provenance and cool backstory of the artwork.

Mark   8)


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Post Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 3:40 pm 
 

Formerly Known As Morno wrote:
Oh, and Cosmic Frog was just me.  "Dragonlord" was the one game WW did that was designed by me, as well as having my illustrations/cover.


This is a really cool factoid. I couldn't dig up anything on this in my research. There you have it.


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Post Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 3:53 pm 
 

MShipley88 wrote:So, did you, like, kill Morno?


I hear Southpark when I read this.  :lol:

MShip is right. I don't think the signature is as important as the factoid of who the author really is. You can always provide a certificate of authenticity (whatever they are!) with the piece if someone wishes.

At any rate, take some pictures or scans of what you have and throw them up. You can either solicite private offers and organize them into a quasi auction or you can throw them up on ebay and let the system mete out the details. Either way give us a sneak peak. I can't stand waiting!

Your latest stuff is great. It is just too bad there isn't a way to provide originals with digital work. I guess I could always buy a poster...but you know what I mean, right?
2 great images....
http://shop.webomator.com/zooms/RadioTimes.html
http://shop.webomator.com/zooms/7Skies.html
And my absolute favorite.....
http://shop.webomator.com/zooms/Jeepers.html

Sorry for making you guys click. I didn't want to hotlink off Brad's bandwidth!


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Post Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 5:24 pm 
 

I really like the line:

"Retropolitan images, set in the world of the future the way it used to be."


I like your recent stuff.  I also think you could find a market for your old style.

Mark   8)


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Post Posted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 2:07 pm 
 

MShipley88 wrote:So, did you, like, kill Morno?  Can you never revive Morno again?  Seriously...not being sarcastic...if you did not sign something in 1978 does that mean that Morno did not draw it?


I suppose in a way, I did.  Morno was a very young guy who did work that has a very young quality to it, and a very seventies quality, I think.  So although I inherited his body and aged in it, I don't really feel that I'm that same guy.

And beyond that - although I know I could be wrong - it was my impression over here that most of you, since you're collecting the material we did back in those days, are mainly interested in the things that were done at that time.  So no amount of signing my work with that old name would make it any more interesting to most of the folks over here since it still wouldn't be that work that's your main interest.

I've really never even considered reviving the pen name, but this does give me some other things to think about, so I will :).  And I'll see what I can dig up in my old files that might be interesting.


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Post Posted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 2:12 pm 
 

scribe wrote:Your latest stuff is great. It is just too bad there isn't a way to provide originals with digital work. I guess I could always buy a poster...but you know what I mean, right?


That is probably the biggest downside to digital work; the matching upside is that unlike traditional media, you can hardly ever overwork or spoil a piece, and not being able to spoil it mens that you can experiment without fear.  So the work tends to be better and to get better more quickly.

My answer to the lack of originals is the archival quality prints - in fact my whole network of websites grew into being because I wanted to produce those, even though for the first few years I was limited to poster quality prints.  I figure that a reproduction that will outlive the buyer is close enough to an original for most purposes.


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Post Posted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 2:14 pm 
 

MShipley88 wrote:I like your recent stuff.  I also think you could find a market for your old style.
Mark   8)


Anything I did today, even in ink, wouldn't be in the same style.  It'd be better in some ways and maybe worse in others, but trying to do the same thing now would be false at best, and a sort of taxidermy at worst :).


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Post Posted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 2:24 pm 
 

If you look around this site you will find frequent references to artists from the golden age of gaming.

Some of us here have even contracted to purchase new works from classic artists...and the work of these artists is still selling very well.

There are changes in style evident in the work of these artists...although Jim Holloway's work on Cairn of the Skeleton King looks exactly like his TSR illustrations.  Still, they remain popular artists.

It just seems to me that any artist should not overlook any market that is interested in paying cash for his work.  If you were not into producing new Morno art, you would still find a ready market on Ebay, the Acaeum, conventions and other websites for projects like posters and art compilation books.  I can see a signed and framed Morno print being a prized piece on the walls of many gamers and collectors.

From some of the things they say, I don't think that many of the classic era writers, artists and creators realize the emotional impact of their work on the adults who used to be kid gamers.

Something to think about.

Mark   8)


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Post Posted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 2:32 pm 
 

MShipley88 wrote:It just seems to me that any artist should not overlook any market that is interested in paying cash for his work.  If you were not into producing new Morno art, you would still find a ready market on Ebay, the Acaeum, conventions and other websites for projects like posters and art compilation books.  I can see a signed and framed Morno print being a prized piece on the walls of many gamers and collectors.


Well, no argument there.  I sure did wonder when my father sent me that copy of "The Dice of Fate" what I might be able to do with that, especially since some of the illustrations would be completely new to almost everyone.


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