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Post Posted: Thu Aug 20, 2015 3:06 pm 
 

With recent auctions of issues of Domesday Book, Random Events, Owl and Weasel, Cymry, etc...of which I won none :) I was wondering if there was a way to get digital copies or photocopies or something of these  and similar newsletters and fanzines.  Or does the community really frown upon this?  I'm fine with them having a giant 'NOT ORIGINAL' watermark across the pages or even being just the text of the documents.  I'd really like to read through these items from the early history of D&D.  I'm also interested in getting my hands on originals, but that seems like it may be a bit out of my reach for the time being.

cheers,
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Post Posted: Thu Aug 20, 2015 3:42 pm 
 

randomluck wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:With recent auctions of issues of Domesday Book, Random Events, Owl and Weasel, Cymry, etc...of which I won none :) I was wondering if there was a way to get digital copies or photocopies or something of these  and similar newsletters and fanzines.  Or does the community really frown upon this?  I'm fine with them having a giant 'NOT ORIGINAL' watermark across the pages or even being just the text of the documents.  I'd really like to read through these items from the early history of D&D.  I'm also interested in getting my hands on originals, but that seems like it may be a bit out of my reach for the time being.

cheers,
Mike


Its probably something thst should be done someday, before these important relics of the hobby start disappearing or being destroyed, especially unique items or historically significant items. Im really surprised someone hasn't taken the time to digitize runs of The Wild Hunt and Alarums and Excursions.

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Post Posted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 12:25 am 
 

I don't think any issues of zines like Alarums or the Wild Hunt are in serious danger of disappearing entirely from the historical record. Let alone Domesday Books, or Random Events, or Owl & Weasel. Cymry, okay, I'll grant that might be in danger of being forgotten, but not for want of being scanned. There was a period of hysteria, I gather, when people doubted whether or not all the DBs survived. It has since been amply demonstrated that any such fears were unfounded.

To the broader question of whether or not there is an easy way to get digital copies or photocopies of these zines, I've pointed out several times that various research libraries hold some copies of these fanzines: like UC Riverside, or Bowling Green State University, and these are places where scholars who need them for historical reasons can access them without undue difficulty. But I don't think it's likely that scans of any of the zines listed above will become available in a commercial sense, due to a host of intellectual property concerns that surround them.


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Post Posted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 1:12 am 
 

increment wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:I don't think any issues of zines like Alarums or the Wild Hunt are in serious danger of disappearing entirely from the historical record. Let alone Domesday Books, or Random Events, or Owl & Weasel. Cymry, okay, I'll grant that might be in danger of being forgotten, but not for want of being scanned. There was a period of hysteria, I gather, when people doubted whether or not all the DBs survived. It has since been amply demonstrated that any such fears were unfounded.

To the broader question of whether or not there is an easy way to get digital copies or photocopies of these zines, I've pointed out several times that various research libraries hold some copies of these fanzines: like UC Riverside, or Bowling Green State University, and these are places where scholars who need them for historical reasons can access them without undue difficulty. But I don't think it's likely that scans of any of the zines listed above will become available in a commercial sense, due to a host of intellectual property concerns that surround them.


I guess my issue then would be, why should these only be available to scholars?  Or someone with a lot of disposable cash laying around?  Don't want to turn this into a intellectual property discussion as the limit on those in internet history must have been reached by now, but surely it would help more than hurt to have a lot of these treasures more easily available.  My example would be the Dragon Magazine Archive, which gave everyone who wanted access to those Dragon magazine articles they would have never seen otherwise., and suddenly everyone was an expert on the Anti-paladin and whether or not Gary really dissed Tolkien.  I think more good than harm has come out of this release (despite what turned out to be questionable decision making on the part of TSR putting together the archive).  Someone who is reading through the first 20 or so issues of The Dragon might be inspired to be the next Matt Finch, Michael Curtis or, heaven help us, Jon Peterson.  :)

In the end I agree there is probably no legal way to make this possible. I'd love to know, however, that someone behind the scenes has digitized this mess for future generations, even if commercial availability is a pipe dream. Lucky the pulp magazine collectors love their hobby so, we have digitized copies of even the crap you probably don't ever need to readm, and it's actually a boom time for the pulp reader like myself (I can go on Amazon and download pulps I have been searching for near 40 years for $3.99 to my Kindle).  And lest one think things "disappearing" is not a possiblity, there are actual motion pictures, serials and tv shows that no longer exist...in any form....due to basically the master copies getting tossed in the dumpster after a certain period of time they were deemed to be "worthless".

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Post Posted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 3:44 am 
 

Badmike wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:Someone who is reading through the first 20 or so issues of The Dragon might be inspired to be the next Matt Finch, Michael Curtis or, heaven help us, Jon Peterson.  :)

The non-availability of the more difficult material was probably more of an inspiration to Jon, I suspect. Many/most people who were spoon-fed TD were totally oblivious to what went on in print, in the first few years, and did not see the need to expand beyond their comfortable horizons: the effects of such "scoping" are amply demonstrated on this site, too.

TD is a broader sort of inspiration; and it was only a poor decision (IMO) in the modern era that removed that from the shelves and being a constant presence in the gaming imagination, however many copies one had actually purchased in the previous decade.
Even on limited funds, dead-tree copies of TD and WD via eBay and its ilk will never be "difficult" (far cheaper and easier than 25 years ago); any degree of "hunting" and "revealing" of those contents - for those who don't just go and buy the whole run at once - being much closer to the original "inspiration" than the more-typical modern-day numbing which sometimes occurs from the ease and bulk of information acquisition.

Anyhow; one could argue quite easily that it's more important to make the contents of Jon's book freely available than all those newsletters/'zines.

increment wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:I don't think any issues of zines like Alarums or the Wild Hunt are in serious danger of disappearing entirely from the historical record. Let alone Domesday Books, or Random Events, or Owl & Weasel. Cymry, okay, I'll grant that might be in danger of being forgotten, but not for want of being scanned. There was a period of hysteria, I gather, when people doubted whether or not all the DBs survived. It has since been amply demonstrated that any such fears were unfounded.

The "hysteria" gets a smile but ensuring the scope of what's out there is constantly prodded, "securing" that in various ways on an ongoing basis, was always going to be a "long term project".

Fragmentation and de-contextualization of primary material (mss., etc.) has always been more problematic than the challenges of gathering "published" material back together, no matter how small scale publication may have been.

increment wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:To the broader question of whether or not there is an easy way to get digital copies or photocopies of these zines, I've pointed out several times that various research libraries hold some copies of these fanzines: like UC Riverside, or Bowling Green State University, and these are places where scholars who need them for historical reasons can access them without undue difficulty.

Setting aside finances (which much of this thread is still inevitably about), geography was/is hugely in your favor there. ;)

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Post Posted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 2:51 pm 
 

Badmike wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:In the end I agree there is probably no legal way to make this possible. I'd love to know, however, that someone behind the scenes has digitized this mess for future generations, even if commercial availability is a pipe dream.

You can rest assured that several someones behind the scenes have digitized, and are continuing to digitize, this mess.

faro wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:The non-availability of the more difficult material was probably more of an inspiration to Jon, I suspect.

True. I wouldn't have bothered to do it if I didn't think it was difficult to do. If it were something just anyone could Google around and cut-and-paste into a book, why bother?

faro wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:Anyhow; one could argue quite easily that it's more important to make the contents of Jon's book freely available than all those newsletters/'zines.

I mean, it basically is already. The Kindle preview is like the entire 1st chapter of my book, then there's the blog, etc. Over time more of this will squeeze onto the web I'm sure.

faro wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:Fragmentation and de-contextualization of primary material (mss., etc.) has always been more problematic than the challenges of gathering "published" material back together, no matter how small scale publication may have been.

Tell me about it.

faro wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:
increment wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:To the broader question of whether or not there is an easy way to get digital copies or photocopies of these zines, I've pointed out several times that various research libraries hold some copies of these fanzines: like UC Riverside, or Bowling Green State University, and these are places where scholars who need them for historical reasons can access them without undue difficulty.

Setting aside finances (which much of this thread is still inevitably about), geography was/is hugely in your favor there. ;)

You know well that I had to visit my share of European libraries to get my research done as well. But yes, that is just money (and time, which is also just money), and the money is always the elephant in the room when this topic comes up. My point is that universities holding copies of these zines provides a check against collectors squatting on the information. If you come across as a scholar, libraries are often willing to mail photocopies even, and the costs can be quite modest.


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Post Posted: Sat Aug 22, 2015 9:01 am 
 

Just a short note.
Money is NOT the only elephant in the room, though I agree it is the most obvious one.
Rarity is also a big concern for many low to mid level collectors and of course rarity drives the money train, so back to you guys....


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Post Posted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 4:20 am 
 

increment wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:You can rest assured that several someones behind the scenes have digitized, and are continuing to digitize, this mess.

Indeed. I recognise a need to digitise and archive the rarities, in the same way some see themselves as providing the service of gathering, protecting and preserving the rarities, so that they are not lost to the world. Whether we, as a community believe we are best placed to perform such a digitising and preservation function is another matter, and one for debate. I would imagine we, as a community, are eminently capable and well placed to make such decisions.

Both questions however are a world away from distributing and making said products available to others. Whilst I recognise a need to digitise and preserve, I do question whether there is any need to pass said information around. As a society we preserve many antiquities, and we collectively pool funds and build buildings to display these to our children. But we do not all have a need to spread free copies of these treasures to every household in the country.


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Post Posted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 12:16 pm 
 

randomluck wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:With recent auctions of issues of Domesday Book, Random Events, Owl and Weasel, Cymry, etc...of which I won none :) I was wondering if there was a way to get digital copies or photocopies or something of these  and similar newsletters and fanzines.  Or does the community really frown upon this?  I'm fine with them having a giant 'NOT ORIGINAL' watermark across the pages or even being just the text of the documents.  I'd really like to read through these items from the early history of D&D.  I'm also interested in getting my hands on originals, but that seems like it may be a bit out of my reach for the time being.

cheers,
Mike


I'm in favour. Collectors with a lot of cash to spare will always want original copies, but many people (such as myself) would just like to have a peek in the hobby's past and behind the scenes.

  

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Post Posted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 12:49 pm 
 

mbassoc2003 wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:
increment wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:You can rest assured that several someones behind the scenes have digitized, and are continuing to digitize, this mess.

Indeed. I recognise a need to digitise and archive the rarities, in the same way some see themselves as providing the service of gathering, protecting and preserving the rarities, so that they are not lost to the world. Whether we, as a community believe we are best placed to perform such a digitising and preservation function is another matter, and one for debate. I would imagine we, as a community, are eminently capable and well placed to make such decisions.

Both questions however are a world away from distributing and making said products available to others. Whilst I recognise a need to digitise and preserve, I do question whether there is any need to pass said information around. As a society we preserve many antiquities, and we collectively pool funds and build buildings to display these to our children. But we do not all have a need to spread free copies of these treasures to every household in the country.


I agree with the first part of your post, but don't understand the second part.  What does it hurt if these treasures are available?  The value of the originals? Is someone going to build an atomic bomb with the contents? And the analogy is flawed, while I can book a trip to the Louvre to see the Mona Lisa, or Bowling Green University to study a manuscript of Dashiel Hammet, it's doubtful whether I can have the same access to a set of Domesday books.  

At a certain point you start sliding into hoarding, exceptionalism, and keeping information from the public simply because the person owning the item wants the prestige and vanity of being the "gatekeeper" to the unwashed masses. There are lots of parallels with what happend to the Dead Sea Scrolls...stored for decades with little research on them simply due to a small cabal of scholars reveling in the unlimited access they, and only they, had over the "common" scholars.

Remember, it wasn't so many years ago that on these very pages there were passionate arguments that TSR/WOTC should never reprint items like the OD&D rules, simply because it would drive down values of personally held collections.  These arguments are continued to be proven as ludicrous as each successive brown or white box is sold to rising prices.  The undercurrent, however, was that the masses "shouldn't" have access to these rulesets...I've always been fuzzy on the exact reasons but again it has to do with the Dead Sea Scrolls scholars ideas of protecting "sacred" knowledge from the unwashed masses.  

Instead, with the reprints and pdfs available we have the largest surge in collecting and actual gaming using old school rules since the '80s.  Access has increased visibility and participation in the hobby instead of stifling it.  So I guess I don't see the point of some half-ass attempt to "perserve" knowledge while guarding the same knowledge like a treasure chest full of gold.

For example, I've long held the belief that until a decent reproduction of Castle Zagyg is available (I have a pdf, the one floating around on torrent sites,  it's questionable quality) and generally available,  there is no pressure to reprint or revisit Gary's last project (held by hoarder Gail and her sychophants).

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Post Posted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 1:34 pm 
 

Mike,

Is it a question of hoarding, or making sure the Domesday Books don't turn into another "TSR Belt Buckle" issue?

That would be my only concern with such a valued item.


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Post Posted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 3:46 pm 
 

Invincible Overlord wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:Mike,

Is it a question of hoarding, or making sure the Domesday Books don't turn into another "TSR Belt Buckle" issue?

That would be my only concern with such a valued item.


Im with you on that. They would be very easy to counterfeit. And they always will be,  just like certain fake pieces of artwork pop up all the time among collectors in the arts. There are gaming items out there now rare enough and obscure enough id be surprised if it hasnt been done yet. It just means anyone out there buying collectibles needs to be careful and wary of deals that seem too good to be true (like the TSR belt buckle fiasco), but thats true of any field.

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Post Posted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 4:34 pm 
 

Badmike wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines: And the analogy is flawed, while I can book a trip to the Louvre to see the Mona Lisa, or Bowling Green University to study a manuscript of Dashiel Hammet, it's doubtful whether I can have the same access to a set of Domesday books.

As I pointed out, you literally can go to Bowling Green State University to study Domesday Books.

Domesday book. (Journal, magazine, 1960s) [WorldCat.org]

Badmike wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:The undercurrent, however, was that the masses "shouldn't" have access to these rulesets...I've always been fuzzy on the exact reasons but again it has to do with the Dead Sea Scrolls scholars ideas of protecting "sacred" knowledge from the unwashed masses.  

I sympathize, there was not a lot of transparency about the information in the Domesday Book until pretty recently. When I was working on my book, I found that very frustrating, and I definitely felt like an unwashed mass, as it were. But I'd like to make two points about that.

First, things are better now. Do you want to play with the original LGTSA medieval miniature rules, which are pretty much the only relevant rules printed in the Domesday Book? Great. Here they have been for the last three years, in an even earlier (and for that reason even more interesting) version:

Playing at the World: The LGTSA Medieval Miniatures Rules

Want to see the system of the Great Kingdom, and the Great Kingdom map? Here's the system.

Playing at the World: The Great Kingdom (Domesday Book #9)

... and the annotations to the DB#9 Great Kingdom map I printed in PatW, which were inspired by my 2014 "12 Treasures" videos, are better than anything you'll find in the DB:

ZENOPUS ARCHIVES: The Land of the Great Kingdom and Environs

Do you want to read "Facts About Black Moor," pretty much the only other thing of historical import that was printed in the Domesday Book? It was reprinted in its entirety in the First Fantasy Campaign, pg25 - actually the FFC version is better than the DB version, because it contains the second half that was never printed because the DB was discontinued. I've been pointing that out, again, for like three years.

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There is vastly more transparency now than there used to be. You have access to the rulesets.

To my second point - at the very inception of my blog three years ago, I wrote a piece about how we as a community have overstated the importance of the DB:

Playing at the World: Heresies of the Domesday Book

I maintain that the Panzerfaust where the LGTSA rules originally appeared is more important historically than DB#5, and well, I've been saying for years that if you want a cheap copy of those rules just as they appear in DB #5, you can get it in a Spartan International Monthly reprint. You won't find anything about Chainmail or fantasy in the DB until after that book saw print - but you would have read about it in Wargamer's Newsletter before. And afterwards, if you wanted to read important Chainmail revisions between 1st and 2nd edition, you'd find those printed in the International Wargamer, not the DB.

I bring this up because I think the mystique, and the absurd valuation, of the DB makes it seem like it is "sacred" knowledge. Actually, the knowledge you need to understand how D&D came together resides overwhelmingly outside the DB, in thousands of other fanzines, letters, and docs which are not nearly so famous nor valuable. Processing that information gives you the narrative. It's not glamorous work, there is no mystique to it. But to be clear - there's no cabal of scholars jealously dominating that material, it is there for anyone to take and is not much of a subject of critical interest among academics.

The rights situation of many of these documents will keep them from ever being reproduced in whole as "licensed" PDFs or what have you - for example, in case this is not common knowledge, the DBs contain tons of copyrighted material that the producers of the zine did not have the rights to. Like most draft material and ephemera, the surviving physical copies will all make their way into libraries and university collections as more of the people holding the documents (myself included) perish or otherwise decide to get rid of them. If you are someone with the scholarly interest to wade through thousands (in my case, more than ten thousand) of these zines, there are already some remarkable collections out there in the academy, and there will be more. And at this point, the chance we'll lose any published work forever is vanishingly small.


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Post Posted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 6:02 pm 
 

increment wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:You won't find anything about Chainmail or fantasy in the DB until after that book saw print - but you would have read about it in Wargamer's Newsletter before.

(And another quote from Gary about making copies to catch up, IIRC).

increment wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:I bring this up because I think the mystique, and the absurd valuation, of the DB makes it seem like it is "sacred" knowledge. Actually, the knowledge you need to understand how D&D came together resides overwhelmingly outside the DB, in thousands of other fanzines, letters, and docs which are not nearly so famous nor valuable. Processing that information gives you the narrative. It's not glamorous work, there is no mystique to it. But to be clear - there's no cabal of scholars jealously dominating that material, it is there for anyone to take and is not much of a subject of critical interest among academics.

The "silly valuations" are inevitable to a degree given the focus created by the site and the old trick of not being able to keep spotlights on more than one or two places at once.
Actual mechanics (which eventually coalesced into D&D) should play second-fiddle to the shift in gaming paradigms visible from the first few issues of Arneson's Blackmoor Gazette and Rumormonger, IMO, but given that it's a hard battle to convince most people to pick up anything that's not on the "official list" or - perish the thought - a "wargaming" rather than "RPG" publication, we're probably still requiring a few paradigm shifts closer to home.


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Post Posted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 7:28 pm 
 

increment wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:
I maintain that the Panzerfaust where the LGTSA rules originally appeared is more important historically than DB#5, and well, I've been saying for years that if you want a cheap copy of those rules just as they appear in DB #5, you can get it in a Spartan International Monthly reprint. You won't find anything about Chainmail or fantasy in the DB until after that book saw print - but you would have read about it in Wargamer's Newsletter before. And afterwards, if you wanted to read important Chainmail revisions between 1st and 2nd edition, you'd find those printed in the International Wargamer, not the DB.

I bring this up because I think the mystique, and the absurd valuation, of the DB makes it seem like it is "sacred" knowledge. Actually, the knowledge you need to understand how D&D came together resides overwhelmingly outside the DB, in thousands of other fanzines, letters, and docs which are not nearly so famous nor valuable. Processing that information gives you the narrative. It's not glamorous work, there is no mystique to it. But to be clear - there's no cabal of scholars jealously dominating that material, it is there for anyone to take and is not much of a subject of critical interest among academics.

The rights situation of many of these documents will keep them from ever being reproduced in whole as "licensed" PDFs or what have you - for example, in case this is not common knowledge, the DBs contain tons of copyrighted material that the producers of the zine did not have the rights to. Like most draft material and ephemera, the surviving physical copies will all make their way into libraries and university collections as more of the people holding the documents (myself included) perish or otherwise decide to get rid of them. If you are someone with the scholarly interest to wade through thousands (in my case, more than ten thousand) of these zines, there are already some remarkable collections out there in the academy, and there will be more. And at this point, the chance we'll lose any published work forever is vanishingly small.


I would like to say here that most of what I'm talking about is discussion just for the purpose of discussion.  Frankly I have so many things on my plate that I'm sure I will live the rest of my life comfortably without ever having reason to dig into the Domesday books, Alarums & Excursions, The Wild Hunt, Tortured Souls, The Beholder, or any number of hard to find publications I don't own.   Hell, there are probably a few 1st edition AD&D modules readily available I haven't read yet or don't remember a thing about.  Also, I would like to state my incredible respect to Jon and what he has done (Yes, I've read Playing With the World, the entire thing, and I have no problem saying that along with Heroic Worlds it is one of the indispensible research works in our under-served genre) and these items of discussion should in no way be seen as any sort of criticism of Jon or his research. Collectors owe him a debt for the extensive and exhausting research, not to mention the mounds of minutia he must have had to sort through to find the diamonds in the poop  :D

I would also like to say that transparency that Jon speaks of owes a great deal to works like PWtW, which caused me to dig through my meager collection of A&E photocopies as it did pique my interest in those fanzines, and the old school movement as a whole, as people become interested in the history of their hobby through the continued support and interest in "dead" systems.

However, I do think we still have a problem in our hobby concerning the availability of early writings on the hobby, actualy games and adventures as well as fanzines and monthly publications.  We are very lucky that the gatekeepers now are exceptional individuals but looking beyond that, the example of what happened to EGG's legacy after his death and the bungling silliness of Gail and her stewardship is a dire picture of the future if copies aren't made of these things, and then made available beyond a small select group of collectors.  

A good example happened very recently, as Bob Bledsaw II just gave Jennell Jaquays the full rights to the magazine The Dungeoneer, one she started way back in the 70s until it was bought by Chuck Angell (and then sold to JG and Bob senior, I believe).  Now, early Dungeoneers are not that hard to find for even the casual fan, but this can only bode well for the hobby as I'm sure Jaquays has plans now to bring these to pdf in some form, and make them readily and easily available, a nice glimpse into the early days of the hobby.  Full kudos to Bob and his generosity in this regard!  

Mike B.


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Post Posted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 8:10 am 
 

Mike,

I think its a balancing act between the general interests of preservation of historic documents, the public interest of having publicly accessible display of those documents, the rights and interests of IP holders, and whether or not we want free access to everything for everyone online in PDF form.

Preservation is, to my mind, clearly needed and desirable. At the moment it is entrusted within the community to the safety and security those capable of buying such things. This also brings on board an issue/desire among some to see information collated and collected. At the moment items reside in a disparate manner across collections around the world, and the very nature of having the resources to purchase said items brings with it the need to work hard (presumably) to achieve such purchasing power, and the desire and free time to collate and study the documents resides with those of us with lesser resources but greater spare time. I really enjoyed the free time I had to collect and build the information I retain on the items I catalogued on Afterglow2.com, but had neither the time nor financial resources to continue the work beyond about 2005.

I would suggest therefor that it is in the public interest for the information contained within these documents to be available for general perusal. But that information need not be in the form of an exact photostatic copy (digital or otherwise). I only need be a verbatim transcription which could very well be an HTML page of text with JPEG images attached.

Contrary to law, I see an IP holder having a moral right to control and influence the his works for the duration of his lifetime, and only in so far as he can demonstrate both a desire to do so, and an attempt to engage with his readership. If he chooses to ignore completely or effectively abandon his work to the general public, to my mind, it can be fair to argue that one is free to do with that work as one pleases in the interests of the readership community, provided it can be demonstrated due diligence was undertaken in pursuing the author, it not being gratuitously for profit, and up until the poit at which the author expresses an interest in reclaiming his abandoned works.

All that said, until there is a secure digital medium, freely distributing digital images of other peoples' works is clearly open to abuse unless we are arguing that it is a desirable goal for all works from everyone to be freely available to all, without cost or penalty, and that only those who choose to buy original works in physical form should have to pay to do so.

If one is going to breach someone else's copyright, and distribute to the world with no control, and without a care for that person's opinion on the matter, let it at least be in the form of a verbatim HTML page and not a true representation of the physical appearance and presentation of his work. At least until such times at we have the ability to control digital media.


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Post Posted: Tue Jan 22, 2019 2:22 pm 
 

I, for one, would certainly like to find back issues of the Wild Hunt. I only have a few of the issues. I'm also searching around online for an article index as well, which would be a great start.


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Post Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 10:53 am 
 

rmeints wrote in Community View on Copies of Newsletters and Fanzines:I, for one, would certainly like to find back issues of the Wild Hunt. I only have a few of the issues. I'm also searching around online for an article index as well, which would be a great start.


You might ping Shannon Appel to see if he did any work on this front, Rick:  he did a lot of small press zine indexes BITD, but I don't recall him doing anything for fanzines.

Allan.


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Post Posted: Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:52 pm 
 

If anyone has a complete or near complete set of the Wild Hunt APA starting from 1978 through to the 1990s when it ended, I would love to chat with them about the contents.
I know it started before 1978, but I am only interested in its Runequest related articles. Please private message me if you a lot these back issues.

Shannon does not have an index of them, btw.


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Rick Meints
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Post Posted: Sat Jan 04, 2020 8:48 am 
 

Speaking of Cymry. There does not appear to be a copy of any issues in the usual archives (Riverside, Bowling Green or The Strong). I also reached out to the original creator who does not have copies.

I am a researcher and looking for issue number 1. Can anyone help with a pointer to who might hold a copy, an introduction or help with viewing two of the articles?

Many thanks in advance.

Michael


P.S. As Jon pointed out above, Riverside, Bowling Green and The Strong have a decent collection of many of the early works, though not all. InterLibrary Loans is your friend and depending on your library may provide scans of desired articles.

  
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