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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 10:18 am 
 

bombadil wrote:Hi Al,
He used to be a member here, on the evaluation board too, I think.  He posted under tfm (which was changed from thefantasymuseum, IIRC, which is also his ebay ID).

His name pops up once in a while in the print-run details (and image credits, I think) in the research section here as well.


ahhhhh right now i see - understand now. i sometimes dont click between real names/acaeum names/ebay names.

at least i know what y'all are going on about now :)

Al



  

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 10:58 am 
 

Xaxaxe wrote:The secondary Civil War/Front Line series had one problem: it was written by Paul Jenkins, who has no ear at all for dialogue; plus, he lost the plot, anyway, about halfway through. Also, he created the Sentry, the most ridiculous comic book character of the modern age.


Blasphemer!  Paul Jenkins may not be the greatest writer ever but The Sentry has the potential to be a great character in the hands of a superior writer (J.M.S. maybe?).  I love the backstory they did for him.  Wasnt it Dr. Strange that wiped him from the memory of everyone on Earth so not only would everyone forget about The Sentry but Sentry would forget about who he really was?  Ridiculous?  Far-fetched maybe but not ridiculous IMO.

  


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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 1:28 pm 
 

Kingofpain89 wrote:Blasphemer!  Paul Jenkins may not be the greatest writer ever but The Sentry has the potential to be a great character in the hands of a superior writer (J.M.S. maybe?).

Hey, it was that other Texan who blasphemed* first! I was just piling on. :)

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* Is that even a word? If not, it should be.

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 2:30 pm 
 

killjoy32 wrote: i sometimes dont click between real names/acaeum names/ebay names.

I have the same trouble, Al ... sometimes, it just doesn't track for me. But BC or someone else usually explains it to me. :)

Hell, I'm even guilty of the same offense; I use different IDs all over the web (although Xaxaxe is definitely used frequently).

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 3:23 pm 
 

Xaxaxe wrote:Hey, it was that other Texan who blasphemed* first! I was just piling on. :)

+++++

* Is that even a word? If not, it should be.

+++++

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Well they should at least give him a new costume and a haircut.  That might help things considerably.  :wink:

The main Civil War series had one problem: it was written by Mark Millar, who not only hates the United States in general, but is a self-promoting hack of the worst order.


Hmmm, never knew that about Millar.  I wonder why he hates the U.S.?  What did it ever do to him?  I dont particularly care for him as a writer anyways.  As far as Brit comic book writers go I think Grant Morrison, Neil Gaiman, and Warren Ellis are top-notch.  Alan Moore...never really liked his stuff.  Watchmen was great and The Killing Joke was a great Batman story but V for Vendetta, League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Captain Britain, From Hell....ehh they were ok.  Never read any of his Swamp Thing run though.

  

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 3:55 pm 
 

Couldn't leave well enough alone, could you Xaxaxe?  Had to keep posting.  :D

Well, now I'm the 13th Warrior!  Relinquish your Avatar at once!


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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 3:58 pm 
 

Xaxaxe wrote:I have the same trouble, Al ... sometimes, it just doesn't track for me. But BC or someone else usually explains it to me. :)

Hell, I'm even guilty of the same offense; I use different IDs all over the web (although Xaxaxe is definitely used frequently).


oh well you will spot me anywhere, as i have the same ID wherever i go :)

Al



  

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 3:59 pm 
 

Kingofpain89 wrote:
Hmmm, never knew that about Millar.  I wonder why he hates the U.S.?  What did it ever do to him?  I dont particularly care for him as a writer anyways.  As far as Brit comic book writers go I think Grant Morrison, Neil Gaiman, and Warren Ellis are top-notch.  Alan Moore...never really liked his stuff.  Watchmen was great and The Killing Joke was a great Batman story but V for Vendetta, League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Captain Britain, From Hell....ehh they were ok.  Never read any of his Swamp Thing run though.


i actually thought V for Vendetta was pretty cool. i really enjoyed that story. The Killing Joke is superb too.

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 4:00 pm 
 

Beyondthebreach wrote:Couldn't leave well enough alone, could you Xaxaxe?  Had to keep posting.  :D

Well, now I'm the 13th Warrior!  Relinquish your Avatar at once!

^^^  :)  :)

Damnit! You're right; I totally lost track.

Ah, but don't relinquish your Evil Genius avatar too quickly; it's a classic. It makes me want to watch the film whenever I see it.

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 4:44 pm 
 

Xaxaxe wrote:^^^  :)  :)

Damnit! You're right; I totally lost track.

Ah, but don't relinquish your Evil Genius avatar too quickly; it's a classic. It makes me want to watch the film whenever I see it.


Hum, 12..twelve...12 days of..no thats not right..dozen..hum, what could be representative of 12.

Image

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 4:52 pm 
 

Plaag wrote:Hum, 12..twelve...12 days of..no thats not right..dozen..hum, what could be representative of 12.

The guys over at the Order of the Stick web-comic do a pretty good d12 parody ... something about how the other dice make fun of the d12 because it's only used for Barbarian hit-points. It's pretty good stuff; I'll post an image if I can find one.

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 6:08 pm 
 

Xaxaxe wrote:The guys over at the Order of the Stick web-comic do a pretty good d12 parody ... something about how the other dice make fun of the d12 because it's only used for Barbarian hit-points. It's pretty good stuff; I'll post an image if I can find one.


The Oder of the Stick does a good job of making fun of many, many things. The "Evard's Tentacles of Forced Intrusion" from waaaaay back still makes me laugh out loud every time I think about it. I owe it to someone on here talking about it. I looked it up and have since spent many enjoyable hours reading it. I hope the author is at GenCon this year. I defintely want to purchase his compilations and get them autographed.

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 8:12 pm 
 

Kingofpain89 wrote:
Hmmm, never knew that about Millar.  I wonder why he hates the U.S.?  What did it ever do to him?  I dont particularly care for him as a writer anyways.  As far as Brit comic book writers go I think Grant Morrison, Neil Gaiman, and Warren Ellis are top-notch.  Alan Moore...never really liked his stuff.  Watchmen was great and The Killing Joke was a great Batman story but V for Vendetta, League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Captain Britain, From Hell....ehh they were ok.  Never read any of his Swamp Thing run though.


Hell, Warren Ellis doesn't just hate the US, he hates the UK, pretty much the entire world, the readers of his comics, etc.  Read some of his rants sometimes.  If you didn't know he was Warren Ellis and he was sitting next to you in a pub mouthing off, you would beat the shit out of him without thinking twice.
  He once had a storyline, I believe it was in Planatery, where Margaret Thatcher was basically the anti-christ and had hired killers offing the second coming of christ....well, just because she's so freaking evil.  I've read some of his rants and they are so ludicrous (in terms of what he think she knows about politics and the state of the world) I could never hate the little nutter, just cause he's so out there.  One of those guys who believes the flouride in the water is a government plot of SOMETHING. Still, he does write some great comics.

Mike B.


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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 8:17 pm 
 

Kingofpain89 wrote:Hmmm, never knew that about Millar.  I wonder why he hates the U.S.?  What did it ever do to him?

He's not a big fan of our policies ... domestic, foreign, interplanetary, or other.

Which is fine, actually — he can think whatever he wants. I brought it up originally to try to emphasize the irony: the guy who loathes America is chosen to write about an American "civil war." I found it to be a curious choice. And by "curious," I mean "terrible."

I, for one, have read my last Millar book; the man is a hack.

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 8:37 pm 
 

Kingofpain89 wrote:
 Alan Moore...never really liked his stuff.  Watchmen was great and The Killing Joke was a great Batman story but V for Vendetta, League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Captain Britain, From Hell....ehh they were ok.  Never read any of his Swamp Thing run though.


Watchmen...brilliant.  Killing Joke...great.  V for Vendetta...ok (If I ever have to read a "Thatcher's Britain/Facist" storyline ever again in any comic I'll shoot myself), League of Extraordinary Gentlemen....first series, brilliant.  Second series, sucked terribly.  From Hell..took itself far too seriously.

Swamp Thing...Moore's masterpiece.  Absolutely shows what a genius can do to stretch the bounds of comic book writing. From the first issue of Moore's run, the incredible "Anatomy Lesson", Moore grabs you by the balls and doesn't let go.  The guy had chutzpah...he starts his run by telling you EVERYTHING about the classic character of Swamp Thing is WRONG, and it gets better from there.  He introduces Constantine, who's never been that good since, and had some great takes on characters like The Floronic Man, The Demon, The Spectre, Batman, the Phantom Stranger, Deadman, and the entire concept of hell and how it relates to the DC universe.
The greatest line?  "How many years have I been here?" "One Day".  Incredible stuff.  


Swamp Thing: The Alan Moore Years
Is Moore's run truly a classic?
by Richard George
December 20, 2005 - Forget The Dark Knight Returns, forget Watchmen. Alan Moore's Swamp Thing is one of the best creative runs in the history of comics, surpassing all expectations and earning its place above and beyond these other classics.

Swamp Thing's strength comes from the fact that it is like nothing else out there. Our "hero" starts off as a monster, escaping from its captors and questioning its humanity. The creature progresses thrughout the next 40 issues from not understanding what it is to becoming a dominant force of nature, able to transport itself across the globe, through space and even beyond the realm of the living. Swamp Thing became Moore's own creative sandbox. The creature was merely bound by the continuity of the previous 20 issues, leaving Moore free to do as he wished. Moore took advantage of this freedom, placing no limits on the exploration of Swamp Thing's world.

Aside from having a relatively fresh protagonist, Moore was also able to devise plots for the creature free from the continuity of the regular DCU. While DC icons Batman and Superman share a common world, Swamp Thing is more or less set outside of that, while still existing within it. Characters such as Batman, John Constantine, Etrigan and The Spectre guest-star in the run, but they are not integral to it. Common spandex adventures are not to be found here, and this title is better without it. In fact, in Book 5, Swamp Thing faces off with Batman; though the fight and manifestation of the creature's powers are incredible, it's actually a disappointment to see this wonderful Vertigo title walk into the "simple" realm of capes and masks. It loses the mystique it typically carries.

One of the most powerful stories in the run is the first standalone issue. It gives a sense of the tone for the series, and segues into an excellent arc featuring the creature and the Floronic Man battling for the right to control nature. The first issue shows our protagonist captured and frozen and the subject of experiments. Our hero is, in fact, the villain of the story, escaping its prison and terrorizing the man holding him there. Moore creates a strong sense of savagery and anger in the creature that is present for the first half of the run -- it is only through love that the creature is tamed.

The Swamp Thing's love for Abby Cable is one of the defining characteristics of this creative run. Though Moore introduces the idea that the creature is just a vegetable with the mind of the deceased Alec Holland, Abby Cable refuses to give up on the monster's humanity. She is often the anchor that allows both the Swamp Thing and the reader to have insight into the fantastical and bizarre world that occupies the pages. She gives "Alec" purpose, for without her it might have simply allowed his mind to be absorbed by nature, lost in the stars, or destroyed by one of its many foes.

The "villains" of the Swamp Thing run range from nature-based to spiritual. One of the thrills of these collections is seeing what insanity is tossed at the creature and his friends next. While the Floronic Man seems pretty outlandish and creepy in the first arc, that's nothing compared to successive opponents. A fear-powered monkey demon, underwater vampires, celestial organic machines, ghosts, evil incarnate, a werewolf and demonic cults are among the many foes for our monstrous hero. While Alec seems like a brutal creature in the first issue, the true scale of good and evil is quickly revealed as some of these enemies come into the light. The creature also becomes less savage as it understands its place in the world and falls more in love with Abby.

Just as crucial to the book as Moore are the artists that bring his creations to life. Stephen Bissette and John Totleben are predominant in the first several volumes of the run. They create an incredible style and mood for Swamp Thing. Emotions and action are perfectly captured with a rough, primal style that frequently heightens the power of the story. The art is not what might be called "mainstream" by today's spandex-oriented standards, but it perfectly complements and augments Alan Moore's writing. Some books are stronger because of the writing or the art, but with Bissette and Totleben, the art forms a perfect synergy with the writing; both are better because of it.

The Swamp Thing volumes are not perfect. From an artistic standpoint, the somewhat frequent (increasingly so as the run progresses) fill-ins are distracting. It's not that the substitute art is poor, but Bissette and Totleben fit the book so well that when they are absent, the book suffers. Any other artist seems too ordinary and too pleasant to fit Moore's primal tone. This is especially noticed during the creature's invasion and domination of Gotham -- it feels like a Batman book and not a Swamp Thing one.

Moore's weakness is that his artists convey more than he realizes. There are frequent illustrative captions that attempt to capture a mood or environment of a place or group of people. This would be fine with some artists, or in a prose novel, but not with his team of collaborators. Often the scene and mood are set perfectly by the art -- and that is noticed first -- that Moore's words come across as unnecessary. This is not always the case, but there is a tendency for being verbose.

If those complaints seem like picking faults for the sake of finding some, that's not far from the truth. Swamp Thing is so masterfully crafted that any complaint just seems irrelevant. Changing artists and an overabundance of description aside, Alan Moore's tenure on this title can still be considered perfection. This is not a superhero book. There are no grand plans to eradicate mutants or rob banks. The heroes are just as monstrous as those that they fight. The most unlikely character can be far more interesting than the franchise players. Everything Alan Moore creates in this book is wonderfully creepy and captivating. Comic readers who have not indulged in this title are missing one of the best runs in the history of this medium. Swamp Thing cannot possibly receive as much praise as it deserves. We read comic books year in and out to experience something this euphoric just once.


Swamp Thing Vol. 1-6
Written by: Alan Moore
Art by: Various
Publisher: DC/Vertigo
Genre: Horror
Price: $12.95-19.95 each
Suggested Age: 16+
Release Date: Now Available


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Post Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 9:04 am 
 

Xaxaxe wrote:He's not a big fan of our policies ... domestic, foreign, interplanetary, or other.


Eh...who is?

Although I do find it kind of funny that the home page of his website shows his desk and on that desk is a mousepad which has a picture of Christopher Reeve in his Superman attire with the Stars and Stripes in the background.

From reading his bio and Wikipedia entry I think he just likes to be controversial.  Maybe he has a man-crush on Alan Moore.  8O

  

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Post Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 9:10 am 
 

Xaxaxe wrote:

Ah, but don't relinquish your Evil Genius avatar too quickly; it's a classic. It makes me want to watch the film whenever I see it.


Well, Evil is not one to disappoint a fan . . .

But, I updated my sig line for a little excitement!


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Post Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 10:36 am 
 

Guess what movie the head design of the demon was stolen from

http://cyberdragonhoard.com/demon.html


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Post Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 10:40 am 
 

Take a stab for this ripped off movie pic

http://cyberdragonhoard.com/Artteeshirts.html


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Post Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 11:09 am 
 

Kosh Vorlontay wrote:Guess what movie the head design of the demon was stolen from

http://cyberdragonhoard.com/demon.html


Legend.  The lord called Darkness.


Awesome movie.  Tim Curry is incredible, as always.


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