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Post Posted: Thu Mar 27, 2008 7:04 am 
 

sleepyCO wrote:Has anyone heard the Dead's version of "Dancing" in full?


Hell yeah, I spent the early-80s golden age of D&D listening to that album. I don't like the Dead's overly-hippified live music, but they made a number of albums in the '70s that resemble fantasy soundtracks ['Terrapin,' 'Blues for Allah'] or pop music ['Dancing,' plus many of the tracks on Shakedown Street & Mars Hotel].

There is still a certain hippy goofiness to all of it, but for the fantasy genre that's a plus. Where would 'The Hobbit' cartoon be without the incredibly stupid folksinging? "The greatest adventure..."

  


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Post Posted: Fri Mar 28, 2008 8:45 pm 
 

Of the above bands which may be a bit off the normal track I would recommend

1 Amplifier a Manchester Spacerock Band (check them out on YouTube, catch Neon, One great Summer and The Consultancy), their eponymous debut is fabulous and
2 Hidria Spacefolk a Finnish spacerock band: you can listen to their first album by download from their site

I also heartily recommend Magma: you will love it or hate it.

The best back track to a campaign recently has definitely been Ozric Tentacles. Sigur Ros for the next one ...

If you are interested in any of this music please check out the prog rock archives at www.progarchives.com/ a truly awesome site


An té nach mbíonn láidir ní folláir dó bheith glic

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-ajduHx5hc

  


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Post Posted: Fri May 16, 2008 12:32 pm 
 

'The Switch & the Spur' by The Raconteurs has appeared on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0GpAoju7dOY

Could have sworn I heard the Dwarves at Bilbo's home sing the chorus at 3:00 of this video.

  


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Post Posted: Sat May 17, 2008 7:13 pm 
 

When my friends and I played Traveller, we always put on Jethro Tull  "Broadsword and the Beast"!

Why?  I mean it seems more D&D, right?  I don't know...

When we played D&D, we listened to "recent" Rush, which was the time was the albums "Permanent Waves" through "Grace Under Pressure".

  


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Post Posted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 6:34 pm 
 

We used to play Jethro Tull as well - and the Horslips for big fight scenes :D

Just now I have been listening to Crystal Method when cycling around town (helps me squeeze between traffic), and some of their faster stuff would make a great soundtrack for D&D combat (esp. at the climax of an adventure).  Example:

http://www.last.fm/music/The+Crystal+Me ... 4fgGZEggxE


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Post Posted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 11:06 am 
 

back in the day We always preferred silence while. I kept the mood in line.

BUT we would roll up characters and paint minis to the likes of Rush, Blue Oyster Cult, ELP, Metallica, Anthrax... this was from the early 80s through the early 90s...

But a my top-10 as of late:

Shellac - the new one
Melvins - the last one
Oneida -the last two
Pumpernickel - the only two
BailterSpace the two turnbuckle CDs
Earthless  - The purple vinyl one
Graveyard - the blue vinyl one
Bird of Avalon - the EP
Teeth of the Hydra - the lst one
Danzig - Danzig II - Lucifuge (guilty pleasure... I just found this in with my D&D stuff at my mom's house)

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Post Posted: Wed Dec 24, 2008 3:06 am 
 

I really need to update this thread more often...it's been over two years since I posted the 10 Cds You Need in Your Collection. Well, here's another ten.....I could probably go 100, but we'll take them ten at a time, that way I can do this another 15 years....
Anyway, I've been going through my collection cleaning out some dead wood, and happened to run across a few pieces of greatness here and there, thought I'd share:

1.  Cornershop---When I Was Born for the 7th Time

What do you get when you combine Indian music (from India), funk, indie and dance/hiphop?  You get a once in a career hit album, one which got Spin magazine's album of the year in 1997.  Unfortunately, Cornershop (basically, Tjindar Singh and whoever he jams with) never put out anything as good as this before or after.  From the two catchy songs that begin the album (Sleep on the Left Side and Brimful of Asha, a tribute to Indian film star Asha Bholse), the album takes a fun ride through many different music styles, including country, even remaking Norweigen Wood at one point.  It's really hard to not be happy when you listen to this album, and you'll find yourself humming along to this lo-fi, hooky minor masterpiece.

2.  Wedding Present----Bizarro

Noise can be good.  The melding of superstar producer Steve Albini and the Presents on their third album struck gold.  Guitars and other instruments madly strummed and burning out the amps at one million miles an hour with quirky lyrics, Bizarro is a collection of singles that plays well as a whole, and interestingly, keeps a constant theme of dark and obsessive love through the songs "Brassneck", "Don't Talk Just Kiss", and "Kennedy", sung in the plainative howl of Gedge's rather ordinary but expressive voice.  Every song on the album is a catchy number, presaging the indie pop of the 90s (Bizarro was released in 1989), and for nothing else you have to get this for the song "Take Me!", an absolutely stunning 9+ minute masterpiece of insanely hammered guitar that will make you wonder how on earth the instruments didn't catch on fire during the song….


3.  Jesus and Mary Chain---Stoned and Dethroned

"Fuck with me and I'll fuck with you, isn't that what we're supposed to do?"  In the first song on J&MC's next to last album, the weary sounding refrain from "Dirty Water" sets the tone for the entire album. The Reid boys sound drained, tired, defeated yet slightly hopeful and dare I say spiritual (nearly every song has references to God, religion, and salvation, particularly "God Help Me", "Everybody I Know" and "Save Me").  When they sing on the same song "I've been swimming in the dirty water/I've been swimming where the fish don't go" it sounds like a metaphor for their entire career…praised by critics and fans, then reviled by the same because of their frequent stylistic road turns.  A definite departure from their classic "Psychocandy" noise and not quite as droning and dark as the follow up, "Darklands", Stoned and Dethroned is quieter, more acoustic, and much more introspective in both sound and lyrics than anything else they ever did. It's by far my favorite J&MC album, with not a single bum song in the lot…."Come On", "She" and "Girlfriend" chug along especially poppy and potent. Unlike a lot of their other stuff, this one really holds up.

4.  Material Issue---Freak City Soundtrack

The 90's was filled with pop genius's who committed suicide (The Gin Blossom's Doug Hopkins being another victim), but the death of Material Issue's Jim Ellison seems the most wasteful of all. With only three albums under his belt (and a 4th, Telecommando Americano in the demo stage), Material Issue had already staked a claim on the top power pop band of the 90's on the basis of their incredible debut, International Pop Overthrow.  However, on their third album, Freak City Soundtrack (released in 1994), they really struck gold although only the critics and loyal fans seemed to notice.  When you read reviews of this album, the words "criminally under rated" and "sadly overlooked" seem to pop up with regularity.  From the power pop masterpiece beginning of "Goin Through Your Purse" the album sets a tone of serious guitar rock through "One Simple Word" and "A Very Good Thing".  The songs are still mostly about chicks and crappy relationships, but the producer Mike Chapman (who also did the classic 1st album of The Knack and Blondie's best albums) brings out the jangling guitars and snotty punk attitude of a 90's Cheap Trick…gee, not very subtle having Cheap Trick's Rick Nielsen play guitar with the boys on a few songs, eh???  The ballads are also quite good, something a lot of power pop outfits can't seem to get right.  Material Issue's best album, by far.

5.  Any Trouble---Where are All the Nice Girls?

When this was released in 1980 Clive Gregson was dismissed as a Elvis Costello rip-off…stupid, because besides ringing guitars and intelligent lyrics this is nothing like Elvis' stuff (maybe because they both wore horned rimmed glasses?)  The songs all deal with typical pop concerns like broken relationships and unrequited love (aka girls blowing you off) and the inevitability you are going to get your heart carved out of your chest by chicks (the song "Girls are Always Right" is a mantra most of us know by now…), but the lyrics are really great (particularly on "Second Choice" and "Playing Bogart"), and the songs tear through one after another like the ultra-competent pub band Any Trouble was.  The ballads are great and show where Gregson would eventually head his career (sad, because IMO his rocking numbers were better). Not rough enough to be punk, with just a touch of country leanings, this is a consummate pop band on the edge of telling New Wave to piss off….unfortunately Clive got more and more interested in soul and R&B, and by their third album was already dumping the ringing guitars and bass lines for over-orchestrated stuff.  But their first album remains a great listen, reminding one of early Joe Jackson, Dave Edmunds or Graham Parker school of rock ("The Hurt" sounds like a lost Nick Lowe song) with a more pop sensibility.

6. Velvet Crush---Teenage Symphonies to God

Following in the steps of their 1991 debut "In the Presence of Greatness", the Crush finds inspiration in the perfect pop song (think Beach Boys) and the classic power pop of inspirations Big Star and the Raspberries to put out what many critics think was the best power pop album of the 90's. With guru Mitch Easter (Let's Active and R.E.M.) at the helm, Paul, Ric and Jeff put out a once in a lifetime masterpiece of hooky songs…they would never again channel 60s & 70s sounding harmonies and tunes as well again.  With tips of the hat to sources as diverse as Gene Clark (covering "Why Not Your Baby"), Matthew Sweet (who pens "Something's Gotta Give", which sounds like it came straight off the album Girlfriend), Brian Wilson and the Byrds, the boys manage to rock out (the tracks "Hold Me Up" and "This Life is Killing Me") and get away with the occasional ballad and country tinged ballad (the Clark song and "Keep On Lingerin").  The best songs, however, are the orchestrated "Star Trip" and quirky, oddball "Weird Summer", which show just how many directions this band could have gone.  Sadly, they never channeled the Gods of Power Pop this strongly again.

6.  The Pooh Sticks----The Great White Wonder
"Hey, get into it, and if you can't get into it, shine it off!" leads off the first song of the album "The Great White Wonder" (released 1991), the most elaborate rock in-joke ever recorded (title stolen from a legendary Bob Dylan bootleg album). Lots of ringing guitars, sing along lyrics, hand clapping and refrains like "Young people…they turn me on!!!" create a mood of rock exuberance that fits the entire concept of a fake wacky band that rips off EVERYONE in the history of rock, from song titles ("Sweet Baby James", "Desperado", "The Wild One, Forever") to stolen riffs ("Rhythm of Love" manges to rip off both Neil Young's "Powderfinger"  and "Tracks of My Tears", "Desperado" does the same to Lou Reed's "Rock and Roll") to stolen lyrics  ("Sweet Baby James" refrain is stolen from Frankie Valli, Stephen Still's "Love the one you with" pops up here and there) and so on…. Oh, yeh, and the album is a pop masterpiece.  Even though the entire album (and band for that matter, the liner notes describing the fictitious Pooh Sticks are hilarious) is a total put-on, it's love for the source and form of pop music is obvious, and the songs are truly catchy and fun. Even the 14 minutes plus "I'm in You" manages to both ape the long drawn out songs from the 60's/70's (Think "Hey Jude", "Stairway to Heaven" or "Freebird" if you want a cultural analogue) while paying homage to them.  If you aren't humming along to the songs on this album the 2nd time through, you take your rock much too seriously….and you just don't get it…..

7.  Cheap Trick---Heaven Tonight

As embarrassed as we might be now remembering singing along to classics like "Surrender" and "Takin' Me Back" back in the day (High School for some of us, I had just started in 1978…), really no reason to feel ashamed.  One of the greatest ever arena rock bands concocted one of the greatest ever arena rock albums in this 70's…more hard rock than actual pop, Nielsen's riffs were classic and influenced an entire generation of rockers, metal heads and even punks.  This album features the classic lineup of Nielsen, Peterson on Bass, Zander on vocals and the incomparable Bun E. Carlos on drums….ironically the lineup would last only two more albums, Dream Police and All Shook Up, before Peterson left to form his own band.   This album is the pinnacle of Cheap Trick's power at creating both catchy riffs and melodies, with great tunes including "Stiff Competition", "Auf Wiedersehn" (Surely the most commercially rocking song about suicide ever cut), and "On the Radio" alternating with quieter ballads like "Takin' Me Back" and "Heaven Tonight". By far their strongest album, it's no wonder most of these songs are the biggest hits that made the "Live at Budokan" tour and album the blockbuster success that finally put Cheap Trick on the map.

8.  The Who---Live at Leeds Deluxe Edition

If you had "Live at Leeds" as a kid, but weren't that impressed, there was a reason…you weren't getting the full picture…or concert, as the case may be.  In February of 1970, at the height of their power (and popularity), the Who played a seminal concert at Leeds university that has gone down as the ultimate performance for the classic rock group.  Having wanted to put out a live album for awhile, they decided to trash all the recordings that had made the year before in 1969 and go with a "one and done" performance at Leeds.  Their instincts were correct…what followed was one of the greatest live performances in rock history, and the Deluxe Edition is the best chronicle yet of that date.  The "Live at Leeds Deluxe Edition" may be the most essential item for your collection if you love The Who, or 70's arena rock, because instead of the tiny six track output you get the entire concert of 30+ songs, including the entirety of the album "Tommy" played after the first half intermission.  It's barely believable that hard rockers like "Heaven and Hell" and a brilliant version of "A Quick One" didn't make the original release, and they are joined by covers such as "Fortune Teller" that are ripped so hard by Townshend, Moon and company that they threaten to catch fire.  The "My Generation" jam is extended from five to fifteen minutes, and not an iota of sound was wasted…if nothing else, this chronicle show just how tight sounding the band had become by constant touring, without making it feel rote and uninspired….a trait which would serve them well during  the making of their masterpiece "Who's Next" the next year.  Critics have commented on the barely suppressed explosive nature of the band (which exploded some nights as the result of Pete and Keith fistfights), here it is just barely held in, but enough leaks through to truly show how dangerous a band The Who could be when they were "on". A lot of the dialogue is also included, showing Pete at his most witty and sardonic, and the power of the band can easily be felt through the great job done mastering and piecing this together….it sounds great, no way you would guess this was made almost 30 years ago.  The Tommy stuff is of course awesome, and despite playing it almost to the point of boredom after a year or so of touring, the band still sounds fresh and interested in the material.  If you are into 70's rock icons, the absence this Deluxe Edition in your music library shows you up for the poser you really are….!

9.  World Party---Goodbye Jumbo

For the most part, Kurt Wallinger is World Party….writing all the songs, arranging the music, and playing most (if not all) of the instruments on the songs.   A former member of the Waterboys,  he left that band to create the wonderful solo debut "Private Revolution" in 1987, then took three years off before creating his masterpiece "Goodbye Jumbo", where his obsession with psychedelic era Beatles, funk, world music and Bob Dylan-like folk fused together (he even references the Rolling Stones with his recreation of "Sympathy For the Devil's" WOO-WOO  chorus at the end of "Way Down Now").  Mixing environmental concerns (Is it Too Late?" and "Thank You World") with ballads ("Love Street") and the poppiest of pop ("Way Down Now", "Put the Message in the Box"), Wallinger tries and succeeds with all the different styles on what seems to be a true "from the heart" set of songs.  As hard as the album rocks in spots, a sort of dreamy sensuality permeates about half the songs, with a utopian viewpoint (most of his songs talk about what he wishes the world were like rather than the reality, both in concrete terms and in his approach to relationships).  This is one of the few really great albums that DOES get better every time you listen to it, as new nuances and rhythms catch you each time…18 years later, I can still listen to the entire damn thing without skipping one single song, and enjoy it just as much as the first time. One of the greatest hidden pop gems of the 90s. (True Story: This was released the same month as whatever Depeche Mode album came out at the same time, and the Depeche Mode album had the promotional moniker "The first great album of the new decade".  I worked in a music store at the time, and with a sneer one of the guys at the counter, after listening to both CDs back to back, stated something to the effect of  "Depeche Mode should've listened to this (Goodbye Jumbo) first instead of that shit they are putting out, they would've never had the balls to say their album was first great album of the decade…."  And he was a Depeche fan).

10.  Echo and the Bunnymen---Ocean Rain


80's New Wave darlings Echo and the Bunnymen (Ian McCullough as frontman and songwriter) reached their creative zenith with this lush, beautiful, yet strangely chilling album.  Mixing punk, electronica and new wave with acoustic guitars, strings and horns, and bizarre lyrics ("Thorn of Crowns" may channel Jim Morrison better than any song ever), it wasn't like anything New Wave had produced up to 1984 (and rarely produced afterwards).  The album's sound is truly gorgeous, from the ringing and uplifting "Silver" to the gothic drama of "The Killing Moon" (their greatest song) to the ending spiral of orchestra backed by McCullough's unique baritone voice on the final track "Ocean Rain".  It's to the credit of the band the album sounds so modern and not dated as many other 80's bands….no one before in the new wave scene had put out anything half as ambitious, and it would be years and years before bands like Ride or Radiohead succeeded in this sort of moodiness and lush atmospherics.  It's not all atmosphere…songs like "Crystal Days' are pure pop exuberance.  Listening to it even after all these years, it seems like the soundtrack of a dream, sung by a modernistic Frank Sinatra (one of McCullough's favorite singers), sweeping and uplifting.  Highly recommended even if 80's music isn't your bag.   "If my heart is a wall, it's soldiers are bleeding, If my heart is a wall, it's soldiers are dead…."

Mike B.


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Post Posted: Wed Dec 24, 2008 11:38 am 
 

Badmike wrote:I really need to update this thread more often...it's been over two years since I posted the 10 Cds You Need in Your Collection. Well, here's another ten.....I could probably go 100, but we'll take them ten at a time, that way I can do this another 15 years....
Anyway, I've been going through my collection cleaning out some dead wood, and happened to run across a few pieces of greatness here and there, thought I'd share:

1.  Cornershop---When I Was Born for the 7th Time

What do you get when you combine Indian music (from India), funk, indie and dance/hiphop?  You get a once in a career hit album, one which got Spin magazine's album of the year in 1997.  Unfortunately, Cornershop (basically, Tjindar Singh and whoever he jams with) never put out anything as good as this before or after.  From the two catchy songs that begin the album (Sleep on the Left Side and Brimful of Asha, a tribute to Indian film star Asha Bholse), the album takes a fun ride through many different music styles, including country, even remaking Norweigen Wood at one point.  It's really hard to not be happy when you listen to this album, and you'll find yourself humming along to this lo-fi, hooky minor masterpiece.


If I didnt know any better, I might think that you listed Cornershop just because I retch everytime I hear "Brimful of Asha".  And the last time that happened was at our last D&D session at your house.  :puker:  :lol:

So here is my "Anti-Mike" list of music I love to listen to:

1. Alice Cooper - Hey Stoopid

2. Bon Jovi - Slippery When Wet

3. Damn Yankees - Don't Tread

4. Def Leppard - Pyromania

5. Europe - The Final Countdown

6. Great White - Once Bitten....

7. Loverboy - Big Ones

8. Night Ranger - Dawn Patrol

9. Poison - Open Up And Say Ahhh.....

10. Ratt - Dancin' Undercover

Whew....I had to listen to about half an hour of Scorpions,Wang Chung, and Lionel Richie just to get that damn Cornershop song out of my head....but it was well worth it.  :wink:


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Post Posted: Wed Dec 24, 2008 11:50 am 
 

I was on a kick to listen to some Siouxsie and the Banshees. She has an incredible voice.


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Post Posted: Wed Dec 24, 2008 4:12 pm 
 

Kingofpain89 wrote:
If I didnt know any better, I might think that you listed Cornershop just because I retch everytime I hear "Brimful of Asha".  And the last time that happened was at our last D&D session at your house.  :puker:  :lol:


Hee hee hee, yeh I remembered that....

So here is my "Anti-Mike" list of music I love to listen to:

1. Alice Cooper - Hey Stoopid

2. Bon Jovi - Slippery When Wet

3. Damn Yankees - Don't Tread

4. Def Leppard - Pyromania

5. Europe - The Final Countdown

6. Great White - Once Bitten....

7. Loverboy - Big Ones

8. Night Ranger - Dawn Patrol

9. Poison - Open Up And Say Ahhh.....

10. Ratt - Dancin' Undercover


Well, Def Leppard is greatness. The rest of the list.....man, you are a child of the 80s aren't you?  (with some early 90's tossed in) Sounds like the soundtrack to every pool hall in Arlington we hung out in on Friday nights circa 1989 or so......

Mike B.


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Post Posted: Wed Dec 24, 2008 5:30 pm 
 

Any Pogues fans here? I classify them as Irish-Folk/Punk


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Post Posted: Thu Dec 25, 2008 5:29 am 
 

King, that list made me retch. :)

The Pogues are great!  

I classify them as Drunk and Drugged (not just the usual drunk) Irish punk/folk.


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Post Posted: Thu Dec 25, 2008 10:13 am 
 

PaulKM wrote:King, that list made me retch. :)

The Pogues are great!  

I classify them as Drunk and Drugged (not just the usual drunk) Irish punk/folk.


Rum, Sodomy and the Lash was a great album, with one of the all time great titles!

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Post Posted: Thu Dec 25, 2008 10:40 am 
 

Badmike wrote:
Rum, Sodomy and the Lash was a great album, with one of the all time great titles!

Mike B.


That was my introduction to the Pogues. That album certainly sealed my reputation amongst my friends of having rather eclectic tastes in music.  :D


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Post Posted: Fri Dec 26, 2008 5:33 am 
 

jasonw1239 wrote:
That was my introduction to the Pogues. That album certainly sealed my reputation amongst my friends of having rather eclectic tastes in music.  :D


:lol:  Fantastic album:  my neighbours must know it by heart now ;)


Even a stopped clock tells the right time twice a day, and for once I'm inclined to believe...we are indeed drifting into the arena of the unwell.

  


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Post Posted: Wed Dec 31, 2008 10:31 am 
 

Badmike wrote:superstar producer Steve Albini...


HA! I find this funny... do you know any other "superstar" producer that has their home phone number listed and posts on his  forum everyday and only makes 30k per year?

Great list Mike. I've been on a Cheap Trick kick lately Have you heard the recordings that were leaked of the Albini version of In Color?

Check out the Birds of Avalon...

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Post Posted: Wed Dec 31, 2008 11:20 am 
 

TheMilford wrote:
HA! I find this funny... do you know any other "superstar" producer that has their home phone number listed and posts on his  forum everyday and only makes 30k per year?

Great list Mike. I've been on a Cheap Trick kick lately Have you heard the recordings that were leaked of the Albini version of In Color?

Check out the Birds of Avalon...


I went on a Cheap Trick run a couple years ago. Anything past Dream Police is just so-so at best, crap at worst, though.

Birds look interesting...I'll check them out.

There is no doubt Albini is very, very wealthy (he owns his own recording studio outright and only chooses projects he himself likes). But he's one interesting cat.  IIRC he only charges what a band can afford, often lowering his rates or dispensing with them for new bands.  One of the very few good guys in the music industry.

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Post Posted: Wed Dec 31, 2008 7:16 pm 
 

Music that I like but that Badmike, King, and Aneoth most likely hate.  Some people have no taste.  :)  Maybe I can sneak these into the playlist for our next session:

Traci Lords - 1000 Fires - Techno/pseudo-darkwave/dance music from Traci Lords.  Juno Reactor contributes the music for several tracks.  The album includes a goofy throwaway track (Okey Dokey) and a chilling spoken-word track (Father's Field). (1995)

Tom Wopat - The Still of the Night and Tom Wopat Sings Harold Arlen:  Dissertation on the State of Bliss- Luke Duke can sing.  IRL he is a Broadway performer. Soulful and sincere performances on both CDs.  (2000 and 2005)

Randy "Macho Man" Savage - Be A Man - A rock 'n' rap album by the one and only Macho Man.  Much better than Hulk Hogan's poppy, saccharin-laden CD (fortunately, my copy of that one got stolen), Macho Man is a passable vocalist in a pro-wrestling way.  One track is about the late Curt "Mr. Perfect" Hennig, and one track calls out Hulk Hogan. (2003)

Leonard Nimoy - Leonard Nimoy Presents Mr. Spock's Music from Outer Space - The 1995 CD has 7 tracks from Two Sides of Leonard Nimoy.  Not bad, though it is more enjoyable when intoxicated. (1965/68)

William Shatner - The Transformed Man - Serious and arty, though unintentionally(?) funny in places. Pretentiousness has its price, and sometimes that price is being mocked.(1968)

An honorable mention goes out to Tales from the Crypt:  Have Yourself a Scary Little Christmas.  It contains such awful rhymes and twisted titles as Deck the Halls with Parts of Charlie and Twelve Days of Cryptmas.

  

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Long-Winded Collector

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Last Visit: May 05, 2021
Location: Garland, TX

Post Posted: Wed Dec 31, 2008 7:29 pm 
 

JohnGaunt wrote:Music that I like but that Badmike, King, and Aneoth most likely hate.  Some people have no taste.  :)  Maybe I can sneak these into the playlist for our next session:

Traci Lords - 1000 Fires - Techno/pseudo-darkwave/dance music from Traci Lords.  Juno Reactor contributes the music for several tracks.  The album includes a goofy throwaway track (Okey Dokey) and a chilling spoken-word track (Father's Field). (1995)

Tom Wopat - The Still of the Night and Tom Wopat Sings Harold Arlen:  Dissertation on the State of Bliss- Luke Duke can sing.  IRL he is a Broadway performer. Soulful and sincere performances on both CDs.  (2000 and 2005)

Randy "Macho Man" Savage - Be A Man - A rock 'n' rap album by the one and only Macho Man.  Much better than Hulk Hogan's poppy, saccharin-laden CD (fortunately, my copy of that one got stolen), Macho Man is a passable vocalist in a pro-wrestling way.  One track is about the late Curt "Mr. Perfect" Hennig, and one track calls out Hulk Hogan. (2003)

Leonard Nimoy - Leonard Nimoy Presents Mr. Spock's Music from Outer Space - The 1995 CD has 7 tracks from Two Sides of Leonard Nimoy.  Not bad, though it is more enjoyable when intoxicated. (1965/68)

William Shatner - The Transformed Man - Serious and arty, though unintentionally(?) funny in places. Pretentiousness has its price, and sometimes that price is being mocked.(1968)

An honorable mention goes out to Tales from the Crypt:  Have Yourself a Scary Little Christmas.  It contains such awful rhymes and twisted titles as Deck the Halls with Parts of Charlie and Twelve Days of Cryptmas.


I made Mike turn off the Cornershop last session, do you honestly think you can sneak a Nimoy or Shatner album in there?  Randy "Macho Man" Savage actually cut an album?  Wow....I guess anything is possible after all those Slim Jim commercials.  Traci Lords?  I'd listen to her do pretty much anything.  :wink:   As for Tom Wopat....I'd rather light myself on fire than listen to that no talent ass-clown.  :puker:


You don't like your job, you don't strike. You go in every day and do it really half-assed. That's the American way. - Homer Simpson

  

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Sage Collector

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Joined: Feb 20, 2006
Last Visit: Aug 27, 2017
Location: Shipwrecked by the laughter of the gods

Post Posted: Wed Dec 31, 2008 7:45 pm 
 

Kingofpain89 wrote:As for Tom Wopat....I'd rather light myself on fire than listen to that no talent ass-clown.  :puker:

Hey, don't make me come down there and shoot a dynamite-arrow from a compound bow!  :)

The Dukes of Hazzard, the A-Team, and Battlestar Galactica (both versions) can do no wrong.  Combining all three into a movie would be great!  ;)

  
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