Favorite fantasy/sci-fi literature other than Tolkien
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Post Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 3:12 pm 
 

There's a novelization (not by Ellison, but including an introduction by him) based off of his original script, though I believe it's somewhat difficult to find: http://islets.net/novels/starlost.html

  

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Post Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 6:12 pm 
 

jasonw1239 wrote:Harlan Ellison in protest of the poor production qualities refused to allow his name to be placed on the product and had it replaced using Cordwainer Bird.


I think I just found my new internet handle!


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Post Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 9:08 pm 
 

Kingofpain89 wrote:
Speaking of light reading....Harlan Ellison did some work for Marvel Comics back in the day.  He had a couple of short stories that were adapted into graphic form for Epic Illustrated which imo were quite good.  Those magazines had some really great stories and putting artwork to the stories made them even better (for the most part).


I just had to go digging through my old Epic Illustrated magazines after I got home and after reading through the first issue I leafed through the contents of issue #2.  Needless to say I was pleasantly surprised that the first story is part one of a graphic adaptation of Robert E. Howard's Almuric.  :D


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Post Posted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 12:55 pm 
 

Terry Pratchett and Michael Moorcock, especially Terry Pratchett. Sadly, he doesn't have a big following here  :cry: , but I read his works in English (and I but the Italian editions when they come out, usually one book once a year  :x ).

  


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Post Posted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 3:13 pm 
 

In no particular order and off the top of my head:

J.V. Jones The Baker's Boy trilogy
David Eddings The Belgariad...haven't read them all
Brooks...the first 3 Shannara books were good before burining out.
Original Dragonlance trilogy..again the first 3 books plus some others
Saberhagen...Book of Swords
Bellairs...the Face in the Frost
Herbert...Dune

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Post Posted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 3:32 pm 
 

Terry Pratchett is absolute genius and, like Bombadil, I think Robert Asprin's Skeeve series is great for a fun read.  :D

Leiber was the first series of fantasy books I read after Tolkiens and being so different it was great to really get me into things.

Brooks Shannara was ok to begin with but became too samey too quickly and I'm still working through Robert Jordans Wheel of Time series, although it's certainly a shame with his passing.  :(

Craig Shaw Gardners various series of books are just madness but can be very, very funny too!


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Post Posted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 5:16 pm 
 

In addition to Lieber, Lovecraft, Moorcock:

J.G. Ballard for dystopian fiction and stories that occasionally push the envelope of fiction construction.

Jack Finney, mostly for short stories with a surprise twist.

  


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Post Posted: Tue Feb 26, 2008 5:18 pm 
 

Bumpity bump bump...

Not strictly speaking fantasy, but definitely worth reading:

THE MYSTERY OF DR FU MANCHU

By Sax Rohmer.  I just picked up an omnibus edition, and it is great rollicking pulpy goodness, full of mysterious conspiracies, wild cult mysteries and heroic investigators.  :D   Great bedtime reading.


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Post Posted: Tue Feb 26, 2008 5:30 pm 
 

Cordwainer Smith! (as some might have guessed from my handle). Other favorites of mine include Leiber, W. H. Hodgson, Clark Ashton Smith, HPL, Moorcock, Frank Herbert...the list goes on.

  

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Post Posted: Tue Feb 26, 2008 7:09 pm 
 

Terry Brooks - The Shanarra Series, didn't like magic kingdom series. I really enjoyed Lloyd Alexanders 5 book Black Cauldron series. Always reading the Forgotten Realms books, Elaine Cunningham being one of the better authors.

  


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Post Posted: Tue Feb 26, 2008 11:49 pm 
 

Other than Tolkien.. does Bored of the Rings by the Harvard Lampoon count?

  


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Post Posted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 4:41 am 
 

sauromatian wrote:Other than Tolkien.. does Bored of the Rings by the Harvard Lampoon count?


I was bought that but never read it any good?

  


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Post Posted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 7:59 am 
 

I thought it was great when I was 12, haven't reread it recently but still have fond memories. I guess the crucial fact here is that I read it before completing Lord of the Rings itself, giving me a certain perspective of infinite silliness on the whole Tolkien experience.

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Post Posted: Sat Mar 01, 2008 5:36 pm 
 

http://cgi.ebay.ca/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vie ... :IT&ih=015



I came across this lot today. I have never heard of these novels before. Who is the publisher? And when were they released? I checked out WotC web site but could find nothing in the novel section.

  

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Post Posted: Sat Mar 01, 2008 6:05 pm 
 

xraygord wrote:
** expired eBay auction **


I came across this lot today. I have never heard of these novels before. Who is the publisher? And when were they released? I checked out WotC web site but could find nothing in the novel section.




Wizards of the Coast/TSR started publishing them with Against The Giants in 1999.  For the most part they are pretty bad.  I actually like the Gygax books better and I thought those were pretty subpar reading.


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Post Posted: Sat Mar 01, 2008 6:16 pm 
 

xraygord wrote:I came across this lot today. I have never heard of these novels before. Who is the publisher? And when were they released? I checked out WotC web site but could find nothing in the novel section.

They are pretty much exactly what you see; the series is pretty straightforward. They are "fleshed-out" versions of the classic 1e adventures, told from the point of view of an adventurer or adventurers, and with lots of background detail and new stuff to get the books up to novel length.

White Plume Mountain was the first one by a "real" author; it is from the fall of 1999. Author Paul Kidd went on to write two more books in the series, and many fans consider them to be the high-water mark of the series. I agree, FWIW: Kidd spins an entertaining yarn.

The series is lucky to have survived Ru Emerson's debut with the Giants novel. It is truly God-awful. Despite being completely predisposed to like the book (D&D fan, played the actual adventure, fantasy fiction fan, etc.), I did not even reach the halfway point. I found out later that I wasn't the only one.

The series just pretty much stopped, nor did it ever receive a lot of publicity from WotC. It always struck me as a pretty easy money-maker for WotC, as the books were by relatively unknown authors and were casually edited at best ... I figured they might just keep going.

There might have been some sort of anniversary or celebration of the Greyhawk setting going on about this time, too. Our own Grodog could probably shed more light on that; if there was something specific these books were supposed to celebrate, I don't remember what it was.

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Post Posted: Sat Mar 01, 2008 6:31 pm 
 

Xaxaxe wrote:

The series is lucky to have survived Ru Emerson's debut with the Giants novel. It is truly God-awful. Despite being completely predisposed to like the book (D&D fan, played the actual adventure, fantasy fiction fan, etc.), I did not even reach the halfway point. I found out later that I wasn't the only one.





Thanks for the insight. Funny thing is I know I will still buy and read them. I'll hunt around my cities used book stores first before I get them off ebay. It'll be the cheapest way for me.

  


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Post Posted: Sat Mar 01, 2008 6:34 pm 
 

xraygord wrote: Funny thing is I know I will still buy and read them.

I think you'll have a good time, overall.

A couple of last thoughts: Kidd's three books form a rough sort of trilogy, in that they feature the same characters, have some of the same running jokes, etc. I would argue that it is best to read those in order.

Emerson's two books ... well, the kindest thing I could say is that she got a bit better with the second one.

The other two are stand-alones and can be read in any order. I remember liking both, particularly Tomb of Horrors.

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Post Posted: Tue Mar 04, 2008 12:04 am 
 

One of my favorites is The Once and Future King by E B White. Most Asimov. Lovecraft is fun. I just finished Spirit Gate by Kate Elliott and I thought it was quite good. Looking forward to the next one on that. I do have a bit of a soft spot for children's fantasy.

  


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Post Posted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 5:21 pm 
 

I thought it apt in our little SciFi / Fantasy thread here to pay tribute to Arthur C. Clarke

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080318/ap_ ... bit_clarke

A brilliant writer and Master of the genre. What a contribution he made. The City and the Star & The Fountains of Paradise are two of my favourite books.

  
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