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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 12:25 pm 
 

Just wanted to rustle up a little discussion about these.  (I'm talking about the long-term BIN-only items, maybe I'm using the wrong term.)

I hate them.
People put in items with absurd prices and let them sit forever.
On some searches, tons come up, and the prices are so crazy, I don't even bother looking.
I know, no one's forcing you to look or buy, and for single item targeted searches, you can use a price limit to filter.

But still, for less targeted searches a price limit doesn't work well.  And if someone were to ever put an item in with a reasonable price, I'd never find it.  And I suspect some sellers put a 'stupid price' item in the store, then put one out for auction to make it seem like a great deal ("Hey I can win this one for only $40, where the store is charging $80 for it!  What a deal!").  And it's just plain aggravating to have someone saying, "Sure, I've got one, and you can have it...for only $90!"

What are the eBay terms for these items, anyway?  Aren't there any meaningful charges or time limits for these time and space wasters?

  

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 12:40 pm 
 

eBay require you to keep a minimum number of items in your eBay store if you open one (and they enforce that too, in the UK). Some people also wouldn't mind selling their items, and can also aford to sit on their stock for a while.

eBay shouldn't be just a list of stuff people want to sell quickly, and its a great leveller as far as price goes. Items find their own value in the market and if the price is 'too high' then something won't sell.

eBay now display store stock in searches as compensation for charging higher fees when store stock sells. Up until recently UK store stock never appeared in regular searches. So I'm glad my listings appear in searches when people are looking for something, and I don't mind paying the extra fees for that.

Also, why put an item up for auction on the grounds that you hope at least two people will want to pay for it in a set 7 day period, when you can set your price and leave it on eBay for three months for the same fee?

Besides, if you're looking for something in particular its always handy if there are eBay stores with those items for sale. And I don't mind paying over the odds to eliminate the competition if its something I really want.

I'm an eBay store owner BTW.


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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 12:55 pm 
 

I've actually gotten some nice deals from eBay stores, myself. :)

But, that aside, I think that the idea is good - a common marketplace where anyone can set up a "store" without mucking about getting a domain, finding the right web-template, then hoping for the best with whatever host they have and the added advantage of having a nearly built-in clientele.

Not too shabby, IMO.

  

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 1:10 pm 
 

I have an Ebay store and I love it, list the stuff (I am reasonable with the stuff I list BTW) and sell it slowly.  I sel 5-10 items a week, not as crazy as auctions.


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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 1:15 pm 
 

mbassoc2003 wrote:eBay shouldn't be just a list of stuff people want to sell quickly, and its a great leveller as far as price goes. Items find their own value in the market and if the price is 'too high' then something won't sell.

Reality is proving this untrue, however.  Regular joes selling on eBay look up to these stores, and are starting to use them as a price guide.  So high prices in eBay stores are translating into high prices on eBay, period.  The items aren't "finding their own value", so much as their value is rising to approximate the price set in the stores.

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 2:37 pm 
 

deimos3428 wrote:Reality is proving this untrue, however.  Regular joes selling on eBay look up to these stores, and are starting to use them as a price guide.  So high prices in eBay stores are translating into high prices on eBay, period.  The items aren't "finding their own value", so much as their value is rising to approximate the price set in the stores.

I could see that there may be a possible 'sway' in values of rares, but when you're talking about the bulk of what everyone buys on eBay, competition keeps prices as low as economically possible.

Our view as a board is distorted by our focus on the rare and collectable. And these items inevitably attract a higher price tag.

I don't hold out any hope of owning an ST1, Woody, etc., but I won't be pissed off or complain if someone sticks one on eBay at a $3K BIN. And if it happens to sit there for six months, I don't think that'll affect prices one bit.


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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 2:46 pm 
 

mbassoc2003 wrote:
deimos3428 wrote:Reality is proving this untrue, however.  Regular joes selling on eBay look up to these stores, and are starting to use them as a price guide.  So high prices in eBay stores are translating into high prices on eBay, period.  The items aren't "finding their own value", so much as their value is rising to approximate the price set in the stores.

I could see that there may be a possible 'sway' in values of rares, but when you're talking about the bulk of what everyone buys on eBay, competition keeps prices as low as economically possible.

Our view as a board is distorted by our focus on the rare and collectable. And these items inevitably attract a higher price tag.

I don't hold out any hope of owning an ST1, Woody, etc., but I won't be pissed off or complain if someone sticks one on eBay at a $3K BIN. And if it happens to sit there for six months, I don't think that'll affect prices one bit.


I Agree, also there is enough of the common stuff on auction already and usually starts at much lower bids, not higher!


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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 2:55 pm 
 

As a sole buyer so far, I believe the store prices are what buyers are gauging when deciding on bid amounts.  It definately plays into how high I'm willing to bid.  If I see a certain item in several stores for $50 or higher that lets me set my high bid at $35 or so.  The higher the store prices the higher my high bid is.  

I also believe as the stores grab up large lots to sell off individaully there will be less autions.

Martin

  

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 3:18 pm 
 

mbassoc2003 wrote:
deimos3428 wrote:Reality is proving this untrue, however.  Regular joes selling on eBay look up to these stores, and are starting to use them as a price guide.  So high prices in eBay stores are translating into high prices on eBay, period.  The items aren't "finding their own value", so much as their value is rising to approximate the price set in the stores.

I could see that there may be a possible 'sway' in values of rares, but when you're talking about the bulk of what everyone buys on eBay, competition keeps prices as low as economically possible.

Our view as a board is distorted by our focus on the rare and collectable. And these items inevitably attract a higher price tag.

I don't hold out any hope of owning an ST1, Woody, etc., but I won't be pissed off or complain if someone sticks one on eBay at a $3K BIN. And if it happens to sit there for six months, I don't think that'll affect prices one bit.


    I agree with everything Ian says  :)
    No matter what you price your item at, in the end the marketplace will correct itself.  It doesn't matter if one seller prices an L1 at $40, eventually lots will come along pricing the item at $9 and Seller #1 will sit on his L1 for a long time, if not forever.
    For an example take a look at Creepie's overpriced stock, it will sit in his store until eternity, he's only paying a quarter a year to have it there, but I really don't think it's having any sort of effect on prices for those items he's unrealistically pricing.
    I actually think prices in auctions sell for prices lower than the norm the majority of times. This is because of the compressed time stuff is in an auction versus a store.  You have to hope not one, but TWO potential buyers spot your item the same week and duke it out to get an above average (or sometimes just average) price. However, in a store, an item can sit for several months until a potential buyer comes along who wants the item for the price you have listed.
  I've gotten to the point where I am going to drastically cut down on the items I list at auction vs ebay store.  Most of my auctions only sell for the opening bid, the kinds of items I sell are not "duke it out" types of items and generate little interest in that regard...whereas in my Ebay store, I get the price I want pretty much everytime, even if I sometimes have to wait several months.   I guess if I was selling more rares or lots, auctions would benefit me more, and that may the case of many sellers on Ebay nowadays.

Mike B.

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 3:19 pm 
 

Blackmoor wrote:I have an Ebay store and I love it, list the stuff (I am reasonable with the stuff I list BTW) and sell it slowly.  I sel 5-10 items a week, not as crazy as auctions.


Any advice to a "soon to be" Ebay store owner? Ya know, like stuff to avoid, or things you wish someone told you (like don't eat the yellow snow. Wish I had heard that Frank Zappa tune earlier)? Thanks in advance!

  


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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 3:27 pm 
 

Prufrock wrote:...It definately plays into how high I'm willing to bid.  If I see a certain item in several stores for $50 or higher that lets me set my high bid at $35 or so.  The higher the store prices the higher my high bid is...
Martin


Tis true of my behavior as well. I look on various sites where I know I can get said item for X, and I base what I am willing to pay on the quality, S/H, etc... of the item.

  

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 3:52 pm 
 

Zippanthropus wrote:Any advice to a "soon to be" Ebay store owner? Ya know, like stuff to avoid, or things you wish someone told you (like don't eat the yellow snow. Wish I had heard that Frank Zappa tune earlier)? Thanks in advance!

One thing you need to know is that no matter what you write on your auction item about insurance and responsibility in the mail, the seller bears all responsibility for ensuring that the item gets to the buyer. You can't avoid that responsibility. You can try to intimidate or avoid the issue with newbie buyers, but any seasoned buyer will tell you that the he can get his money back from you regardless of what you say or how you do business.

So send recorded to buyers with low feedback and buyers you're not sure about, even if it's at your own cost.

The level of your sales will be dependant on the quality of your images and the completeness of your description.

Don't try buying up job lots and selling them individually if you're dealing with conventional D&D products. The market is flooded and the sellers here will tell you that the only way to make a living that way is to have the contacts to buy half your job lots privately, and sell in huge volumes. The profit is very low in that area of the market.

Know your product. Don't just refer people to Acaeum. Good luck.


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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 3:58 pm 
 

Prufrock wrote:If I see a certain item in several stores for $50 or higher that lets me set my high bid at $35 or so.  The higher the store prices the higher my high bid is.

If I set my store price for an item at $50 and it pushes up the price people are willing to bid, I have no problem with that. But as Mike says, the market always levels itself. It goes through peaks and troughs with a high over Winter and another in Early Autumn, and lows in between.

And bear in mind that the rares and collectables that the board looks is a completely different product from the bulk of D&D sales.


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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 5:56 pm 
 

My opinion, for what its worth.

Any old item, in this case D&D and AD&D books, is only worth what acollector is willing to pay.  This goes for any antique collectable.  If collecting this material becomes fashionable, prices will rise as competition gets fiercer.  On the other hand, if nobody wants it, then prices will drop through the floor.  So, that being said,  its a matter of balance and the stores should not affect the informed collector; however, new collectors may be influenced as high store prices will mis-inform them.


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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 5:57 pm 
 

deimos3428 wrote:
mbassoc2003 wrote:eBay shouldn't be just a list of stuff people want to sell quickly, and its a great leveller as far as price goes. Items find their own value in the market and if the price is 'too high' then something won't sell.

Reality is proving this untrue, however.  Regular joes selling on eBay look up to these stores, and are starting to use them as a price guide.  So high prices in eBay stores are translating into high prices on eBay, period.  The items aren't "finding their own value", so much as their value is rising to approximate the price set in the stores.


Ditto. I got priced out of buying a white box set because a guy wanted 75% of what someone had listed it for in their store--which was at least 60% more than it was worth. Didn't want to hear about prints, condition, etc. Chapped my ass.

That said, I like the stores, overall.


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Post Posted: Tue Mar 07, 2006 12:32 am 
 

From reading all the replies above, it occurs to me that the problem is not the eBay stores or the way they sell their products, but the general ignorance of other buyers and sellers. With cheap access to the internet for the vast majority of the great unwashed, that is a problem that is only going to get worse.


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Post Posted: Tue Mar 07, 2006 11:36 am 
 

A general rise in Ebay RPG prices is likely to continue for the near future.  It strikes me that the current wave of active collectors is mid-30's to mid-40's in age.  Guys who were 20 when the D20 wave hit are likely to start more hardcore collecting over the next several years.  I don't know what these guys will want to collect, but "old school" remains "old school" no matter how many new schools there are.  (I think that makes sense...yes.   :? )

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