Depressing thought...
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Post Posted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 1:15 pm 
 

Reading this article made me think about stopping in to see how all you are doing.  

http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB114083232066183248-3_yPrOHBN0M5WJLDYi_8KI5wcsM_20060305.html?mod=blogs

I really need to write down instructions for my wife concerning my collection if I die first.

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Post Posted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 1:39 pm 
 

McDuff wrote:Reading this article made me think about stopping in to see how all you are doing.  

http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB114083232066183248-3_yPrOHBN0M5WJLDYi_8KI5wcsM_20060305.html?mod=blogs

I really need to write down instructions for my wife concerning my collection if I die first.


Since I dont plan on having kids, maybe I can have my collection cremated with me and then made into a gemstone that my then-wife can hang around her neck or wear on her finger.   :D

  

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Post Posted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 1:52 pm 
 

That quite a range of collectibles.  Final editions of closed newspapers sounds kinda interesting.  
Others...
the 700-member National Toothpick Holder Collectors' Society, gives away toothpick holders to young people. She tells them, "Here's your start." But few get hooked.

...not so much.

Any time you start feeling silly/obsessive, remember how far up the collector's ladder we are.  

When we die, I guess if you don't have interested relations, a mass seller like cougar, guido, Titan, Noble Knight, etc. maybe the best option.  Would anyone here really want to drop a couple grand on someone else's full collection?

  


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Post Posted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 3:30 pm 
 

Man, talk about throwing away money...I'm leaving good instructions on how to sell off all my collections.


"Surely you don't disbelieve the prophecies just because you had a hand in bringing them about?" J.R.R. Tolkien

  


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Post Posted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 3:40 pm 
 

McDuff wrote:Reading this article made me think about stopping in to see how all you are doing.  

http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB114083232066183248-3_yPrOHBN0M5WJLDYi_8KI5wcsM_20060305.html?mod=blogs

I really need to write down instructions for my wife concerning my collection if I die first.


This is really good advice.  Back when we first got started on seriously buying up old collections, I had a woman come in with "boxed games" she said, filling her van.  I was anticipating "monopoly and life" and went out to her van, and saw 500+ Avalon Hill and SPI games (and others).

She wanted $2 each, and not really knowing what they were worth, I insisted on paying $5 each.  I put them on our website (this was 1999) and listed them all for $35 each.  You know, Bloody April and GunSlinger and Titan all for $35 each (along with the dogs).  

Lucky for me a fellow retailer clued me in to what their real value was, and I sold them at much more - and still kinda feel bad I didn't pay more.

Two years ago a fellow had died, and he left his daughters instructions on his collection of miniatures.  He had about 125,000 fantasy 25mm figures, hundreds of blisters and boxes, the oldest and rarest of Ral Partha, Grenadier, GW and more.  They wanted $16,500 for his collection (which I could not afford at the time) and ended up taking $12,250 for it.  But, had they just wandered into their local store and sold it, they may have gotten as little as, perhaps, $500?

I have also heard stories about comic collections being dumped to a local dealer for 1% of thier value.

Your collection is the culmination of a love of games as your hobby, and you have put hours of your life into it (and money, don't forget money).  Catalog it, share it's value, and recommend 3 or 4 dealers you would trust to buy it from your loved ones!

I imagine my coin collection will, eventually, be sold on eBay by my daughter (and every coin is labeled as to it's value!).


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Post Posted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 4:41 pm 
 

To be honest and a bit cynical, when I'm gone I don't think I will care for my collection anymore. If it will be of any interest or economic help to my relatives or close friends, so much the better for them, otherwise it won't be my concern - not anymore, at least. I will have enjoyed collecting my stuff and owning them, so it will have served its purpose. And like the unicorn says to Sturm "we do not mourn those who die fulfilling their purpose" (or something rather similar - from Dragons of Autumn Twilight).

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Post Posted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 6:02 pm 
 

mordrin wrote:Would anyone here really want to drop a couple grand on someone else's full collection?


I'd pay a couple of grand for some of the collections here.  It wouldn't be as much fun as finding the stuff piece by piece but it would probably be a lot cheaper.

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Post Posted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 6:37 pm 
 

NetRodent wrote:
mordrin wrote:Would anyone here really want to drop a couple grand on someone else's full collection?


I'd pay a couple of grand for some of the collections here.  It wouldn't be as much fun as finding the stuff piece by piece but it would probably be a lot cheaper.


Another collector this would be a problem, on a tooth pick collection I'd prob not do it. What is interesting is the numbers of people that collect, 700 tooth pick collctors, sound like a lot and not many both at the same time, and they all have roughly the same numbers of collectors out there, makes me wonder exactly how many RPG collectors out there? roughly the same? ... I particularly like ..

"Some collecting groups have created unstated policies. The 650-member National Milk Glass Collectors Society -- a group devoted to opaque glass -- holds an annual auction. When the rare young person shows up to bid on an item, older collectors lower their hands. "We back off and let the young person buy it. We want them to add to their collections," says Bart Gardner, the group's past president."

Brette:)

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Post Posted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 7:45 pm 
 

so when I think its safe to aquire my first set of OD&D books (ie my wife wont kill me for spending the money on some "books") everyone will back off and I'll get them for $25?

  


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Post Posted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 8:19 pm 
 

Yeah, right...and people like ****** will snipe at the last minute.

(Don't want to name names - just fill in your favorites.)


Didn't someone on these forums plant a seed about an RPG/wargaming museum somewhere?


Dave, get the barbarian in the corner a drink, quick!

  


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Post Posted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 8:20 pm 
 

Disjected wrote:so when I think its safe to aquire my first set of OD&D books (ie my wife wont kill me for spending the money on some "books") everyone will back off and I'll get them for $25?



Just tell her that she's lucky you're not buying that Gutenberg.


Dave, get the barbarian in the corner a drink, quick!

  

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Post Posted: Sat Mar 04, 2006 11:15 am 
 

I have a question,

Do you think that in 50 years for example (not far away from our life expectancy here on that board  :cry: ), a collectible market for D&D items will still exist ?

I understand that collecting comics, old books, pens, watches, stamps... -or whatever you want- will still exist... but what about D&D items ?

One of the stronger -if not the only- explanation of our collecting is nostalgia, and I don't think other collections have the same motor. And in 50 years, I am not sure that people will still have such a nostalgia about these items. Maybe I am wrong, you know french people...

Of course I don't see my collecting as an investment for the future but I have some doubts about is value in 4 or 5 decades... But that won't stop me to collect  :wink: !

What do you think ?


Kingofpain89 wrote:Since I dont plan on having kids, maybe I can have my collection cremated with me and then made into a gemstone that my then-wife can hang around her neck or wear on her finger.   :D


BTW Great idea Kingofpain89 !
Maybe it will be the better way for them after all. -For the gemstone I have some doubts, I will prefer some ashes' dispersal à la Big Lebowski !

  


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Post Posted: Sat Mar 04, 2006 3:42 pm 
 

le Rahib wrote:I have a question,

Do you know that in 50 years for example (not far away from our life expectancy here on that board  :cry: ), a collectible market for D&D items will still exist ?


Actually, I don't think so. I firmly believe that all those who did not know that RPG like we did won't have much interest in this stuff.

le Rahib wrote:Maybe it will be the better way for them after all. -For the gemstone I have some doubts, I will prefer some ashes' dispersal à la Big Lebowski !


Counterwind?

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Post Posted: Sun Mar 05, 2006 11:12 am 
 

guerret wrote:Counterwind?


:wink:

  


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Post Posted: Sun Mar 05, 2006 3:14 pm 
 

le Rahib wrote: Do you know that in 50 years for example (not far away from our life expectancy here on that board  :cry: ), a collectible market for D&D items will still exist ?


Now there's an interesting question. With the staggering advance of computer technology, it's not unthinkable that we'll see "true" Virtual Reality that interacts with many of our senses in our lifetimes. Imagine a "DM" being able program a dungeon akin to the Niven/Barnes' Dreampark.

So would people still want to do cooperative storytelling the old-fashioned way -- P&P RPGs?

I feel optimistic. Movies have CGI nowdays that is virtually indistinguishable from life. Modern blockbusters are amazing experiences. Yet...

Theater is still wildly popular! People act on stage, with a minimum of stage effects. And people still go to these productions.

Why?

  


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Post Posted: Sun Mar 05, 2006 3:27 pm 
 

red_dawn wrote:Theater is still wildly popular! People act on stage, with a minimum of stage effects. And people still go to these productions.

Why?


Because some plays still have a spark of intelligence movies lack?

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Post Posted: Sun Mar 05, 2006 7:43 pm 
 

In another 40 years all of our connections with reality will be probably be so tenuous we'll not need thses fantasy games to divorce us from reality :D

Sad but true ;)

  


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Post Posted: Sun Mar 05, 2006 10:10 pm 
 

red_dawn wrote:Theater is still wildly popular! People act on stage, with a minimum of stage effects. And people still go to these productions.

Why?

Simple.  In 2006, at least, the human brain is still the most efficient computer on the planet, and it will be for many generations to come.  Provided you use it as directed:

Theater is popular because human actors can provoke the mind, not just flood the senses with information.  The more we let our brains "fill in the gaps", the more immersed we are in a given performance.  Literally immersed -- you become the play, and the play becomes you.  Your brain is doing what it was designed to do -- create a universe from limited sensory information.  

However, the more we rely on high-bandwidth special effects, the more our brains become relegated to basic A/V decoding devices.  This is not really their forte, but they are capable enough machines to provide a passable result.  (Fortunately, no "Blue Screen of Death"!)

That's also why crappy low-resolution games like "Pac-man" were addictive, and why table-top RPGs are superior to video games -- they are immersive.

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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 12:28 pm 
 

deimos3428 wrote:
red_dawn wrote:Theater is still wildly popular! People act on stage, with a minimum of stage effects. And people still go to these productions.

Why?

Simple.  In 2006, at least, the human brain is still the most efficient computer on the planet, and it will be for many generations to come.  Provided you use it as directed:

Theater is popular because human actors can provoke the mind, not just flood the senses with information.  The more we let our brains "fill in the gaps", the more immersed we are in a given performance.  Literally immersed -- you become the play, and the play becomes you.  Your brain is doing what it was designed to do -- create a universe from limited sensory information.  

However, the more we rely on high-bandwidth special effects, the more our brains become relegated to basic A/V decoding devices.  This is not really their forte, but they are capable enough machines to provide a passable result.  (Fortunately, no "Blue Screen of Death"!)

That's also why crappy low-resolution games like "Pac-man" were addictive, and why table-top RPGs are superior to video games -- they are immersive.


Nicely put.

Then I can still hope to teach RPGs to my grandkids. :)

  


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Post Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 12:39 pm 
 

Reminds me of "Amused to Death" by Roger Waters.  He talks about television, but the same can be said about video games.  And people in America wonder why so many jobs are lost to outsourcing.


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