Did you play the original D&D?
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Post Posted: Tue Oct 25, 2005 12:04 pm 
 

zhowar1 wrote:but I just watched the Omen and the Fog for the first time last week.


Please, please, please tell me you watched John Carpenter's original version of the Fog and not the new one out in the theaters... and if you did see the new one in the theaters, find John's at your local rental store and give it a look.  I turned the Fog into a D&D adventure many years ago for a group of guys who were all fans of the movie -- when the group cleric was brought in to "speak with dead" on a couple of corpses pulled off a fishing skiff the night before, and the one corpse said "Threeeee...." the penny finally dropped.  The player gets pale, turns to me and says "there didn't happen to be any fog in the bay last night, by any chance?"  Priceless.


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Post Posted: Tue Oct 25, 2005 12:17 pm 
 

John Carpenter is by far my favorite horror director. I have all of his movies. Prince of Darkness was probably his best.


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Post Posted: Tue Oct 25, 2005 1:16 pm 
 

Yama-Arashi wrote: Please, please, please tell me you watched John Carpenter's original version of the Fog and not the new one out in the theaters...


Yes, the original. When a remake comes out, it just reminds me I need to see the original and then I usually ignore the remake.  :)

I liked the Fog, but there were some scenes in the movie that didn't really fit in the plot (like the corpse getting up at the med examiner's) and Carpenter's commentary revealed that these scenes were added late in production because the movie wasn't scary enough. The Thing is still my favorite...it is the only horror movie I own on DVD.

Re: turning the Fog into an adventure - that is a great idea. A lot of horror movies might work well that way. Have you tried any others? I am reminded of an old Role Aids module based on the movie The Keep (though I have yet to see that movie).

Deadlord36 wrote:Prince of Darkness was probably his best.


I saw that over 15 years ago and enjoyed it. I need to watch it again. Alice Cooper is in it, isn't he?

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Post Posted: Tue Oct 25, 2005 6:42 pm 
 

John Carpenter is by far my favorite horror director. I have all of his movies. Prince of Darkness was probably his best.


I knew there was something I liked about you DL.  :wink:  Prince Of Darkness is great, strange, horrific fun.  I got hooked on John Carpenter movies with the original Halloween.  I have all of his movies except the Elvis flick, Darkstar, and Memoirs of an Invisible Man.  They Live, In The Mouth of Madness, and Escape From New York are still my favorites of his.

Escape from L.A. and Ghosts of Mars should have never been made though.  And I for one think Vampires killed James Woods' career.  :P

  

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Post Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 12:37 am 
 

Old D&D, the Thing, Stoker's Dracula...no wonder I keep coming back to this board!

Oldman gave the performance of a lifetime in that movie IMHO and was robbed for Best Actor.  Not so much by Pacino, as it was one of those let's-make-sure-he-gets-this-award-at-some-point-in-his-career nods, but by the Academy.  I mean, the guy wasn't even nominated; Clint Eastwood was!  Clint F^@&ING Eastwood!  I'm sorry, but Unforgiven SUCKED and Clint's character was retarded!  Okay, maybe it didn't suck, but it can't hold BS Dracula's undead jock.  You live in the middle of friggin' nowhere in the wild west and forget how to ride a horse?!?!  Could the Count have been played any better, in any of his incantations, much less in all of them?!?!?  Nay I say!

Okay, the rant is over.  I now return you to your regularly scheduled thread...


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Post Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 12:41 am 
 

In the Mouth of Madness is awesome.

    Dude, you need to see The Keep.  It can be found in most large video stores.  The film is a bit dated (very 80's) but the story is very good, with a soundtrack by Tangerine Dream.  After you see the movie you need to read the BOOK.  (Movie first, then book...yes, reverse the order.)

    I have run The Fog as an adventure on at least four different occasions with changing groups of gamers.  Since my gamers tend to be slightly younger than me they never remember the movie.    :roll:


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Post Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 1:45 am 
 

Back on the tourneys front:  I entered and played in many, but the only one of consequence that I won was DragonCon #1's AD&D Open:  Gygax and Kuntz DM'd the final round, along with one or two other judges, and the team I was with won (we weren't judged by them, which may have been an advantage in our favor, since they wanted to go have a few brews; one of our players heard Gary say something to the effect of "Let's kill these guys fast") :D

Alas, I never got the prize/statue/plaque/whatever; on the plus side, though, that's show where I met Rob Kuntz, which started our long friendship.


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Post Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 8:22 am 
 

This thread brings back memories.  I started playing this game in 1977 or 1978 with a friend in school.  It was the blue boxed set.  When this friend was visiting my home, he had the idea of putting a note up on a board to find other players.  Shortly, we had a group of 8 or so, everyone from different highschools in the area, and this group turned me onto AD&D.  We played for a couple of years, and then the group just kind of evaporated as the members developed other interests and some went to college.  I stopped playing in 1980, and haven't had any contact with those people since then.

But i do remember the fun time I had with these folks, all of which were really decent people.  And smart to: I know a couple became engineers and the 2 girls became doctors.  I remember first names, but that's about it -- I wish I had kept up with these folks.

What is really funny is that here I am -- almost 30 years later -- and I still remember the rules and many of the adventures.

Out of the blue, I justed thinking about this game, and understand the current rules have changed quite a bit.

How many have played continuously since they started this game so many years ago?

  


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Post Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 8:23 am 
 

This thread brings back memories.  I started playing this game in 1977 or 1978 with a friend in school.  It was the blue boxed set.  When this friend was visiting my home, he had the idea of putting a note up on a board to find other players.  Shortly, we had a group of 8 or so, everyone from different highschools in the area, and this group turned me onto AD&D.  We played for a couple of years, and then the group just kind of evaporated as the members developed other interests and some went to college.  I stopped playing in 1980, and haven't had any contact with those people since then.

But i do remember the fun time I had with these folks, all of which were really decent people.  And smart to: I know a couple became engineers and the 2 girls became doctors.  I remember first names, but that's about it -- I wish I had kept up with these folks.

What is really funny is that here I am -- almost 30 years later -- and I still remember the rules and many of the adventures.

Out of the blue, I justed thinking about this game, and understand the current rules have changed quite a bit.

How many have played continuously since they started this game so many years ago?

  


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Post Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 9:17 am 
 

For the life of me I'm trying to remember those last names.  

Did anyone play in mid-New Jersey in 1979-1980 time frame around the Sommerville area?  

There was a Dave and Dan who were brothers; another Dan who had a sister who played; a Beth; a Sandy; and someone else.  Lord, this will drive me crazy until I remember those last names.

  

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Post Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 9:48 am 
 

I started with the Moldy Basic and set with B2, and then got the Moldy Expert book. We played with these from '84 through to '88, all the time playing 1E AD&D in a club at school as well. So when we played Basic at home, it was suppliment by house rules.

We all live in Germany (parents in the forces), and when we spent money to post things over from the UK, it was almost always lead figures. So we never played any of TSRs modules except B2 and T1 (before ToEE was published).

We took turns buying White Dwarf from a shop that imported foriegn magazines and it did the rounds throughout the month. I don't remember playing any of the scenarios from WD except Chun the Invincible (or some such thing) and it was crap. Almost everything we played was our own creation, including one DM who though it would be cool for us to go and explore Mega City (2000AD) or some variation.

Once I moved up to Scotland, I played Battletech almost exclusively for three years, and then I started DMing Planescape when the first campaign boxed set was released. It fell appart on account of Planescape not being the best setting for an old time Dungeon Crawler. Time and location haven't seen me play since maybe '94. So collecting is a nostalgia thing.


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Post Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 12:41 pm 
 

sgy wrote:How many have played continuously since they started this game so many years ago?

I've played continously since I was 9 years old ('80) except for a haiatus of about 4 years when I moved around a little and couldn't find a good group.  When I moved back to CT, I was walking down Main St., Middletown (on my way to court, actually) and had a few minutes to kill at a new comic shop.  There was a sign a few feet inside the door that announced a new AD&D campaign starting that Friday.  I debated whether or not I'd come, but talked to the owner for a few minutes to feel him out.  I was still undecided come Friday but figured I'd give it a whirl as I had nothing else better to do.  Well, that first game pulled in 13 people and was the most fun I'd had in years.  I've played/DM'd virtually every week since that day almost 10 years ago, with essentially the same group.  Once in awhile we take a break and have tried 3E, Castle Falkenstein, Traveller, Cyberpunk, Werewolf/Vampire, boardgames, etc., but usually not for very long and we always come back to AD&D.  And of those 13 people that I met that Friday night, one (the owner of the comic shop, now defunct) is going to be the best man at my wedding next year and five more of them remain close friends.  I even roped my brother in and he'll be DMing for the first time this Halloween (our game night is Monday): some kind of one-shot that he's keeping under wraps.  I've always said there's no better excuse to get out once a week than to roll some dice and laugh your ass off.


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Post Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 7:56 pm 
 

Hello folks!
I've lurked here constantly for a while now, this is my first post.  All this nostalgia is giving me such a case of the warm fuzzies, I just had to contribute.

I was bitten by the bug way back in the eighties, when I was about 11-12 years old.  This was a bit too late for the OCE or Original D&D game.  I started out with the Basic/Expert Box Sets.

When I hit middle school, about 6th grade, I met a neighborhood kid who ended up becoming one of my best friends.  He was really into D&D and he introduced me to it, one day in homeroom.  Strangely enough, this kid's parents were strict Baptists, and thought the game was demonic.  I mean, they actually used that word when admonishing him (and me when I was at his house) not to play the game!  This being back in the heyday of the D&D witch hunts, he couldn't own any dice or books - but he was able to occasionally smuggle friends' books into his house and he had a pretty decent grasp of the rules from memory, and we just used a handful of regular six siders to approximate whichever roll we needed.   We played these ad hoc games almost every day, quietly in study halls and even in class when we could get away with it.

I was instantly hooked.  I got my older brother involved, too, and that christmas we got the Basic and Expert Box Sets.  Man, did we have fun with those!  I quickly gravitated towards DMing, and I ran my brother and many of our friends through many an adventure.  About the time I entered High School, everybody there was playing AD&D,  so we started using those rules.   I still remember the day I got my 1st Ed DM'S guide, with the giant red Efreet on the cover.  That was awesome!
Years passed, I joined the service.  I was transferred around alot and didn't get to play much except for an isolated ad hoc session here and there.  I bought all the 2nd Edition books when they came out, but because of the constant moving I didn't get to use them as much as I wanted.
Flash forward about 9 years.  I'm out of the service, settled in back home with a steady job.  Hadn't played D&D too much, or had time to think about it.  Then Third Edition comes out.  I picked up the new books out of curiousity, and determined to start playing again.  I got some of my friends and family together and started a group.  My fiance (now wife)  even got involved, and she really enjoys it.  When 3.5 came along, we upgraded.  I'm back behind the DM screen, and very happy about it.  One of these days, I'm getting my old 1st Ed books out and starting a campaign with them.   :D

So I've played Basic/Expert, AD&D 1st and 2nd Editions, 3.0 and 3.5 and I've liked them all very much.  I'd say there's definitely a different "feel" to each one, but there's just no bad anywhere, at least for me.  Also, I'm not a collector per se, just sort of by default, since I've never thrown away or sold anything D&D related that I've accumulated, and I could never bring myself to do so;  Too many happy memories!

Sorry for the long post!  :oops:

  


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Post Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 8:35 pm 
 

sgy wrote:For the life of me I'm trying to remember those last names.  

Did anyone play in mid-New Jersey in 1979-1980 time frame around the Sommerville area?  


I was in the Cherry Hill area of South Jersey, and gamed with folks up at the various shows in New Brunswick, too, sgy (Northeaster 1, 2, and 3; EastCon; GenCon East 2; etc.).

Please check out my Treasure of the Dragon Queen thread and let me know if any of that rings a bell or not:  NJ gamers are rarer than I'd prefer.

There was a Dave and Dan who were brothers; another Dan who had a sister who played; a Beth; a Sandy; and someone else.  Lord, this will drive me crazy until I remember those last names.


I can't help you there, but I did dig up some notes from a guild of gamers of some sort; I'll check them out to see if they're relevant or not.


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Post Posted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 1:05 am 
 

How many have played continuously since they started this game so many years ago?

    *Raises hand*  

    "I'm a gamer but I can change, if I have to, I guess."


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Post Posted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 6:35 am 
 

[size=9]MShipperly88 wrote:[/size=9]
I have never met anyone who actually used weapon speed in a real game.  Weapon speed factor was one of those rules that even the designers knew could not really be used.


Well meet your first ( takes a bow )! I DMed most of the time and we used weapon speeds - those 10 segments. We even randomised when the weapon strike occurred within it speed allowance. :roll: Made the longsword the weapon of choice for Fighters - attack at 5 segment speed for 1D8 damage.  Spits on bastard sword option

Good memories. Starting in around 1977 with some home made rules invented on the back of playing a character in a couple of games at my local historical miniature wargaming club in Welwyn Garden City.  Strangely it was a Quakers' Meeting House we hired - always thought it was odd they were happy to rent it out to a wargaming club! Quite refreshing if they could spot the different between recreating warfare and taking part - although I suspect they just wanted our business. D&D almost took it over eventually.

After about 3 or 4 months of home-made rules (the imagination level was high to make up for it and everyone seemed to enjoy themselves) moved on the the blue softback "basic level"s booklet. the original booklets and supplements - and eventually AD&D after a few years long after most people had converted.

Good memories - but haven't played for what - twenty years now. Time and a place. Time and a place...

  


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Post Posted: Tue Nov 01, 2005 6:33 am 
 

Finally got my electricity back.  I'm getting very tired of hurricanes.

Grodog --  That must have been a "blast from the past."  I wished I had kept some of that stuff, but it was all thrown out a long, long time ago, after I moved away, and my parents retired to Florida.  

But it has been fun to reminisce about the past.  So much time has past; I must be getting old.

What's the deal with the different editions?  Was it simply a marketing ploy?

By the way, for you collectors take a look at AbeBooks Official Site - New & Used Books, Textbooks, & Rare Books.  It is a service which connects 1000's of used book stores throughout the states and UK.  I've been very sucessful in hunting down out-of-print books by using their search engine.  I bet you can find some old D&D stuff in these stores.

  


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Post Posted: Wed Nov 02, 2005 5:46 pm 
 

Here's something interesting I just read over in Gary Gygax's discussion thread at Enworld:

gary gygax wrote:What has astonished me is than no group I know of has ever attemptet of impersonate young giants in the G1 adventure. I set it up so that could be done and would likely be effective too...

Cheers,
Gary


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