Vacuum-sealing
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Post Posted: Sun May 08, 2005 8:55 pm 
 

When I started to collect 2 years ago, I purchased a Food Saver to vacuum-seal as much of the collection as I could in order to preserve it as best as possible. Up to this point, just about the only thing I've sealed has been a lot of Dragon mags. I put 2 consecutive issues back-to-back with cardstock in between so the covers face out. I place a weight on top to keep them flat while I seal. The Food Saver bags were opaque on one side, so I use Black-and-Decker bags because they are clear on both sides. They look pretty good.
  I was wondering if anyone else has done this and if there were any problems, such as print bleeding. I haven't done any of my more valuable pieces yet. I also plan to do this for as much of my wargame collection as I can, so if anyone knows of any probs with that I would appreciate it.
  Also was wondering if this might be an effective method for taking care of mustiness or mold. Let's hear some thoughts on this please.
                           Tom


Started playing D&D at Great Lakes in '76-'77. Went to Dungeon in Lake Geneva. Got to adventure in original Blackmoor. Saved some rare pieces from then, not in best shape: Palace of Vampire Queen, Beastmaker Mountain. Started collecting recently.

  

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Post Posted: Sun May 08, 2005 9:50 pm 
 

I think a regular heat gun and shrink wrap would be a much cheaper way to go!


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Post Posted: Wed May 11, 2005 5:01 pm 
 

No-one has any opinion on this subject? Has no-one tried this or thought about it? Come on, everyone. Hasn't this topic ever come up?
                                                   Tom


Started playing D&D at Great Lakes in '76-'77. Went to Dungeon in Lake Geneva. Got to adventure in original Blackmoor. Saved some rare pieces from then, not in best shape: Palace of Vampire Queen, Beastmaker Mountain. Started collecting recently.

  

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Post Posted: Wed May 11, 2005 10:56 pm 
 

Vacuum sealing sounds good but I would consider two potential pitfalls. First, the plastic could emit gasses harmful to the books or cause a chemical reaction with the paper, ink chemicals, or the inherent acidity of the paper. Secondly, most paper products need to have some level of humidity to prevent them from becoming too dry. SW or bags allows for this gas/moisture transfer.

Cost would also be a consideration. Have you figured out what the estimated cost is per book and compared it to SW or a standard bag and board?

Interesting approach though. I'd be curious to see the long-term results.  It certainly wouldn't allow additional contaminants to get in such as mold spores.  Of course, if they were already present it won't help, except to render them inactive since most molds needs oxygen.  At least you will get some additional use out of your machine!

  


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Post Posted: Mon May 16, 2005 12:38 pm 
 

If you're using plastic bags that have harmful chemicals in them, that are acidic you are going to turn your pages yellow and brittle.

I've had enough comic books and Dragon magazines turn color from cheap bags.

From what I understand mustyness is there to stay, but mold will become dormant.

But there is mold everywhere in the air.  Just need to keep humidity controlled.

Foxing, I'm not sure if that would prevent it from spreading.

I cringe anytime I see items up for auction on eBay (white box sets for example) that have mold and mildew damage that are visible.  I think of how this is going to contaminate whoever's collection they are heading to.

When I get items in the mail if they have mold or mildew they go right in the trash, I open them outside and they never come inside to contaminate my other stuff.

  
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