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Joined: Jun 12, 2004
Last Visit: Feb 15, 2021

Post Posted: Sat Jan 22, 2005 10:18 pm 
 

BTB, you should do this more often.

I got my items last week, and I have to tell you that the DMG, in spite of the pencil artwork, is in perhaps the nicest condition I have ever seen.  Which is good, because my orange spine DMG wasn't in great shape when I bought it last year.

What was really odd was that the PHB and DMG were originally owned by the same person, and the DMG was in better shape, which tells me where this person's preferences lay (player).  The PHB was in really sad shape (knew this already), but it was easily one of the most shaken (book hinges loose) books I have ever come across.  Not anymore.  With a little glue, an X-acto knife, tweezers, and a lot of patience, the book's binding is just like new.  Considering it was a 4th print with no value, the decision was easy.  Just as easy a decision as the one which led me to put a B1 that had been mangled by a stapler back together.  Perhaps I should get into the business of repairing playing copies of AD&D books.

The thing that surprised me with that PHB was how it was bound.  I always thought that the pages of early printings of the original three books were bound with staples within the cover so they didn't pull apart.  In doing a bit of research on textbook bindings, I found that this actually is sometimes the case, but not always.  To my surprise, when I did the repairs on the PHB, the pages were bound together with nylon thread, in a modified form of Japanese binding, instead of stapled like I thought, and definitely not smythe sewn, like my 1st print DDG.

As I mentioned before, I did a bit of research into the different types of hardcover bindings.  You have smythe sewn binding, which is what my DDG uses, and you have adhesive casebound, which has the pages glued to bristol board and a backing fabric, the whole glued to the spine.  Now, I know that when TSR revamped the art and went to the orange spines, they changed how they bound the books.  Essentially, these were nothing more than paperbacks with hardcovers.  The real question is, before going to the orange spines, which printings had the most durable bindings?



  


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Joined: Jul 10, 2003
Last Visit: Nov 27, 2019

Post Posted: Tue Jan 25, 2005 6:14 pm 
 

If Panzer Blitz isn't gone, I'd love to have it; I'll even struggle with a trivia question for its sake.

  

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Last Visit: Jun 05, 2020
Location: Chicago

Post Posted: Tue Jan 25, 2005 11:21 pm 
 

Hi Breach -

Dungeon rules and Geomorphs arrived a couple fo days ago - thanks very much. I'll finally be able to play again after 25 years....

Regards

Mike

  


Grandstanding Collector

Posts: 5611
Joined: Nov 16, 2002
Last Visit: Feb 23, 2021
Location: Wichita, KS, USA

Post Posted: Thu Jan 27, 2005 1:20 am 
 

Paul, my freebies and trivia prize arrived today---thanks muchly! :D

My wife Heather was eyeing my bookcases when she heard about your strategy of giving away your books for free....  :?  :D :D


Allan Grohe ([email protected])
Greyhawk, grodog Style

Editor and Project Manager, Black Blade Publishing
https://www.facebook.com/BlackBladePublishing/

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