Dragon Magazine Modules
Post new topic Reply to topic Page 1 of 21, 2
Author

User avatar

Grandstanding Collector
Acaeum Donor

Posts: 7949
Joined: Jun 23, 2003
Last Visit: Apr 15, 2021
Location: DFW TX

Post Posted: Fri Oct 15, 2004 3:40 am 
 

Thanks to BeyondtheBreach in another thread for bringing up a subject near and dear.  When we first started playing D&D back in the late 70's, there wasn't a huge selection of material to choose from module-wise.  To top it off my own efforts frankly sucked.  So novice DMs like myself, once we worked through the published stuff like the classic "letter" series of modules, would typically fall back on the modules published in Dragon magazine as part of their Module Design Contest that ran in the early 80's.  These were published every few months for a few years in Dragon magazine (the publication of Dungeon magazine would eventually lead to Dragon no longer carrying these short one-shot adventures). In general, I don't recall a single stinker in the bunch, and as a matter of fact a few became staples of my campaigns.  I ran the many of these again and again, and their quality at least matched if not surpassed many of the "official" TSR offerings at the time.  I thought I might review a few of these that I've used more than once, maybe some other oldies like myself can share some thoughts about their favorite Dragon magazine adventures.  
    FOREST OF DOOM in Dragon Magazine #73, May of 1983, is an adventure I've run several times and each time it has gotten a great reception.  At the time, it was interesting because it featured Drow before they became the ubiqitous inhabitants of every other hack creation being published nowadays.  Back in 1983 they had only appeared as the main villains in the D-series and Q1, which came out in 1980, and were definitely not the overused badguys they became and still are to this day.  Without major research, I think this was the first published adventure since the D series and Q1 to feature Drow as a villain (from 1980 to 1983 I don't think they appeared commercially).
    Anyway, the point being that at the time they were still seen as the deadly and mysterious creatures of the underdark, and still had the capacity to bring excitement to the game table instead of bringing unpleasant pictures of Drizzt and his scimitars to mind.  Not to mention the very unique dungeon setting Scott Butler picked for his award winning adventure.....
     First Place winner of Category A-2 in the Module Design Contest, Forest of Doom as for a party of 4-8 characters of 4th to 7th level (being the main opponents are Drow spellcasters, I'd lean towards the higher levels there).  This 15 page adventure is typical of those in the Module Design Series, setting up a fairly good background/motivation for the adventure, one generic enough to be lifted to any campaign if needed. To summarize, a "dark" forest of evil beings surrounds a prosperous land, and must be traveled through regularly for trade reasons. Sporadic raids are taking place on the edges of the forest, and inevitably the player characters are sent to find someone or somethng called "Arron" who is responsible for leading these attacks.  To do this, they must enter the dark forestand find the base for these raiders.
     The author sets up the plot well as Drow are never mentioned, although several clues are given (darts smeared with some like of fungus as well as pitted and decayed blades are found after the raids) that would immediately give it away to many of today's gamers.  Plus, another red herring is that after meeting the Drow under the circumstances of the D-series, players at the time didn't suspect that a dark forest, not an underground cavern, could hide the sun-hating dark elves unless they were very familiar with the monster description in the Fiend Folio.  
    The Drow are not only raiding from the forest, they have set up a somewhat unique fortress/base INSIDE a gigantic tree in the heart of the forest.  Parts of the tree have been hollowed out to form rooms and passages and a rationale is given as to why the tree has survived this and even thrives.  As far as I can remember, this is the only published TSR adventure that takes place within a gigantic tree, and the uniqueness of the locale adds to the adventure.
    When the Tree Fortress is located, the characters must plan an assault in most cases not knowing Drow are their foes (unless they have run into a Drow patrol during random encounters).  Battling bugbears, giant spiders, Quaggoths, stirges and the occasional drow (another nice thing about this adventure is that they keep the Drow somewhat mysterious and unique by not throwing dozens of them at the party) the party makes their way "up" the inside of the tree to rescue slaves and confront the mysterious leaders.  
    The Tree Fortress only has three levels but due to the claustrophobic nature of the "dungeon" it might take awhile to clean it out.  The final encounter is particularly nasty, with two high level drow leaders (8th cleric and 7th fighter/mage) and their five henchmen in a large chamber the drow enemies can easily use to their advantage.
    The treasure and magic doesn't look excessive, and the creatures and traps faced are varied and interesting enough to keep the PCs on their toes. All in all, this was an excellent adventure that could have perhaps been polished up to be an adventure that we would remember as a "classic" crawl if it had been published as an actual module instead of a contest winning adventure in Dragon magazine. I've run this adventure several times, changing it up depending on the circumstanes, and have always gotten good feedback from the players.  Highly recommended.
    BTW, anyone want to list the issues of Dragon these adventures were published in?  I'm too lazy.  Plus would like to hear comments on anyone else's favorite Dragon magazine adventures.

Mike B.[/code][/list]

 WWW  

User avatar

Long-Winded Collector
Acaeum Donor

Posts: 3861
Joined: Feb 21, 2004
Last Visit: Jan 28, 2021
Location: Milford, Michigan

Post Posted: Fri Oct 15, 2004 9:40 am 
 

We had several guys that would DM back then. One of them, who shall remain unnamed, would often run Dragon-published adventures.

Forest of Doom lived up to its name. He slaughtered at least two parties before we even set foot in the real dungeon part. We got away from it (because no one had characters of that level left). He started another campaign and low and behold about two year later we were back (though we did not know it at the time). I think we were all around 6th or 7th level. Guess what, we actually made it into the Tree. Then we got slaughtered again. Two years...some great characters...all dead!

Of course, this was the modus operendi of that particular DM. He consistently dropped us into adventures that our PCs had no way of surviving. He once ran a module (can't remember which one) and we had to roll new 1st level characters. First encounter - at night in the woods - we run into a horde of undead including a half dozen wights... 8O  We died, again...Then we ask him what level is that module for..."First level" he says.  8O  Coould you check that again. "Oh...well...I guess it is set for 4-7th level...

I do remember another Dragon adventure that had something to do with a magic spear and a plague. I seem to remember liking that one...


And I could've bought these damn modules off the 1$ rack!!!

New modules for your Old School game http://pacesettergames.com/

Everything Pacesetter at http://pacesettergames.blog.com/

 WWW  

User avatar

Verbose Collector
Valuation Board

Posts: 1922
Joined: Nov 16, 2002
Last Visit: Apr 21, 2021
Location: Ohio, The land without sun

Post Posted: Fri Oct 15, 2004 12:49 pm 
 

Oh, the Drow were so wonderfully evil and tough.  The party I took through it just shook their heads in disbelief the whole adventure, but they wouldn't stop.  They succeeded in completing it but only after losing two of the strongest party members in the final encounter.  Definitely a classic!

  


Prolific Collector
Valuation Board

Posts: 682
Joined: Oct 13, 2003
Last Visit: Sep 13, 2019
Location: Denver, CO

Post Posted: Fri Oct 15, 2004 12:58 pm 
 

Forest of Doom was a great killer dungeon.  My group used all kinds of crazy recon (teleport, divination, invisibility, flight, ethereal, etc.) for an entire session before they went in.  They thought they weren't detected, but they had been near the end.  Vicious fights filled with drowic thralls and legions of summoned monsters (poor goblins!) were the order of the day.  The halls were claustrophobic and horrific.  The leaders ended up escaping, but the tree was purged in about 6 sessions with 2 character deaths (both later resurrected by a grateful priest, for a service).  It was intense.
8O

Best game I ever had with a Dragon module was Garden of Nefaron (#53?).  An evil mage is entombed in a soul gem, guarded by a ki-rin, and a group of evil PCs are determined to break him out ... or at least loot the place.  My group was good/neutral, so we generated some high-level evil characters and let them go at it.  It was an amazing change of pace and one of the best puzzle adventures they ever had.  One survivor, who later became an arch-villain in the campaign.

Speaking of puzzle dungeons, it's worth noting Greenwood's Assassin Run (#64?) was later re-used in an official module.  Who can name it?
:wink:

  


Active Collector

Posts: 55
Joined: May 28, 2004
Last Visit: Oct 17, 2006

Post Posted: Fri Oct 15, 2004 1:01 pm 
 

Was it Den of Thieves (Thieves Den)?

  

User avatar

Prolific Collector

Posts: 851
Joined: Jun 12, 2004
Last Visit: Apr 07, 2021

Post Posted: Fri Oct 15, 2004 8:23 pm 
 

I've got two in my possession right now that are just fine and dandy adventures, especially the second one.

Quest for the Midas Orb is an adventure for characters of up to 9th Level.  They are sent on a quest to retrieve the Midas Orb, which has the power to turn objects into gold.  The Orb has been stolen by a wizard and hidden away in his tower.  (May, 1982).

Fedifensor is that perceived rarity of rarities, an adventure taking place on the astral plane.  For 6-8 characters of level 7+, the adventure is a "search and recover" mission, with the members of the party searching for the lost sword Fedifensor, or "Defender of the Faith".  Unknown to them, the sword is in the possession of some Githyanki. (November, 1982)

In both cases, the adventures were cut from the magazine, and as such I don't know the issue number, only the date.



  

User avatar

Grandstanding Collector
Acaeum Donor

Posts: 7949
Joined: Jun 23, 2003
Last Visit: Apr 15, 2021
Location: DFW TX

Post Posted: Fri Oct 15, 2004 9:03 pm 
 

darkseraphim wrote:Speaking of puzzle dungeons, it's worth noting Greenwood's Assassin Run (#64?) was later re-used in an official module.  Who can name it?
:wink:


Dark, was it used in H3?  Or is my memory not up to snuff?

Mike B.

 WWW  

User avatar

Grandstanding Collector
Acaeum Donor

Posts: 7949
Joined: Jun 23, 2003
Last Visit: Apr 15, 2021
Location: DFW TX

Post Posted: Fri Oct 15, 2004 10:01 pm 
 

Ahh, I had so much fun reminiscing about Dragon magazine modules, let's do another of my favorities:
Barnacus: City In Peril was another favorite of mine...in fact, the city in question served as the main base of one of my longest lasting campaigns.  I once ran a campaign that took place within an archepelago of hundreds of tiny islands, where most of the adventures took place aboard ship or under the sea.  I used Barnacus as the main city that the characters used as a home base when not fighting pirates or monsters, and ran the adventure pretty much as laid out as the character's introduction to the city and the island nation.But back to that later...
Barnacus, written by Francois Nantel, appeared in Dragon #80, December 1983.  It won 1st place in the Module Design Contest for Category A-8.  This adventure, for character levels 1-5, is probably overpowered for those levels since the main foe is a deadly 9th (!) level Mage who controls a gang of low to mid level thugs. A good idea is to use Raboca (the mage) behind the scenes rather than as the ultimate villian, otherwise you have a group of low level characters getting taken to the woodshed by a 9th level mage, never a pretty sight.
   The adventure hook is pretty basic: the adventurers answer an ad (sheesh!) or are summoned by Duke Haermond, leader of the city, to investigate why local merchants and supply trains are being hit with unerring accuracy.  The rationale is actually pretty good for hiring the characters, as he can't trust any "inside" government or military agents due to the suspicion of spies.  Hopefully Haermond can trust the characters, he does have a Detect Evil that has to suffice to prove loyalty and honesty.  The town is antsy, the Duke is worried, and the characters have all the motivation they need in a classic 1st edition situation: treasure, magic and beating on bad guys, what more could you ask for?
     From here the town is waiting to be explored.  By today's standards it is actually pretty skimpy, as only 80 areas are described (rather sparingly at that).  However, at the time not many commercially available city adventures existed, and the Judge's Guild City of the Invincible Overlord and City of the World Emperor were excessive if you just wanted a small port town such as Barnacus.  If you wanted to use the city more than once, like I did, lots of background had to be supplied.  
    Hopefully at some point in their investigations the characters will come upon the abandoned "haunted" house, in whose basement the entrance to the tunnels and chambers of the Snake Pit awakes.  Seven encounter areas are spread all over the city in chambers connected by the tunnels that run under the streets, which is good because it give a low level party time to rest, heal and relearn spells as they travel the tunnels.  A band of jermlaine allied with the spies can make things tough in the tunnels, but besides them there are few non-human foes, the others being war dogs, snakes, spiders, giant rats and centipedes, and oddly enough an Eye Killer used to guard an area.  The module makes good use of humanoid foes who include a 4th level assassin (probably the toughest) but mostly 0 lvl mercenaries so the low level party will have a fighting chance.  Due to not knowing the type of foes, how many, and who their enemies are, the tunnels can become a nervewracking place to explore if you use the jermlaine and their tricks correctly.  
   Being as the leader of the gang Racoba is a 9th level Mage, I wouldn't have him actually encounter the party as they clean out the tunnels.  As he is also the leader of the mage's guild (sneaky bastard!), he plays out as a good behind the scenes arch villain who can bedevil the characters long after they have destroyed his gang.   They might even end up having to go to Racoba for level training or to learn spells!
    All in all, although it doesn't stand up well 21 years later, Barnacus was a good example of a city adventure at the time.    It might not hold up well but I know the couple of times I ran the adventure both groups really enjoyed the exploration of the tunnels beneath the city and the eventual unmasking of Racoba.  

Mike B.

 WWW  


Prolific Collector
Valuation Board

Posts: 682
Joined: Oct 13, 2003
Last Visit: Sep 13, 2019
Location: Denver, CO

Post Posted: Sat Oct 16, 2004 12:16 am 
 

>>Dark, was it used in H3? Or is my memory not up to snuff?

That's it.
8)

  


Active Collector

Posts: 55
Joined: May 28, 2004
Last Visit: Oct 17, 2006

Post Posted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 10:46 am 
 

Traveller,
Quest for the Midas Orb was published in issue #61.  It has some decent rooms and encounters but I was a bit let down by the conclusion of it.

Fedifensor was published in issue #67 and is a great adventure.  The Dragon#67 also included a large article on the astral plane.  A very good issue indeed.  I've never had the pleasure of playing or DMing this one but it is on my dream list.  

Bbarsh,
The module with the magic spear and the plague is Citadel by the Sea from issue #78.  A great low level (1-2) adventure pitting the players against a small clan of orcs who have penentrated an old fortress in search of the magic spear that is a bane to elvenkind.

Some of my other favorites Dragon adventures include:
Wandering Trees(#57):  a mid-level adventure that has the party exploring an ancient druidic ruin that was wiped out years ago by a barbarian horde.  A truly great adventure that includes a large wilderness area and with many encounters (in addition to the extensive ruined complex).

Chagmat (#63):  another good low level adventure that I've run multiple times.  Using a cliched plot hook (rescue missing villagers), the adventures travel to an old dungeon in a mountain to combat an old foe (humaniod spiders) that terrorized the region decades prior.  I enjoy it because there are some good encounters, the finale is a good battle and the new monster is pretty cool.

Into the Forgotten Realms (#95):  a really mid-level good dungeon crawl into an old wizardry school, althougth it contents plot elements specific to the Forgotten Realms and the final encounter could easily result in a TPK.

Aesirhamar (#93):  a high level adventure that takes the party to the outer planes (where the Norse gods reside) in search of a rogue giant with a powerful hammer.  I liked it because it added a new element for the players to experience.

Ruins of Andril (#81):  a mid/high-level desert adventure that involves the adventures finding an egyptian temple that is only appears once a year (or so) and sinks back into the sand after a day.

Halls of Beoll-Dur (#41):  classic dungeon crawl into a dwarven temple complex.  I just loved the maps.  

Garden of Nefaron #53: (previously mentioned)

  

User avatar

Verbose Collector
Acaeum Donor

Posts: 1709
Joined: Feb 04, 2004
Last Visit: Aug 23, 2016
Location: Chandler, AZ

Post Posted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 4:20 am 
 

"The Dancing Hut" was in Dragon #83 and is a high level adventure that features Baby-Yaga.  

Pretty cool if you are looking for an upper level module for characters - also the hut can be used inventively and woven into your own adventures.  The nature of the hut and it's design also enable you to change/modify encounters with ease or create your own rooms.  I used this adventure as part of an ongoing quest to retrieve a gem that held the imprisoned soul of a legendary wizard. . . the difficulty was, the gem was in the possession of a Type V demon on the abyss.  Much investigation revealed that she was an "ally" of Baby-Yaga (at least, as much of an ally as Chaotic Evil creatures can be).  Further adventures led to the hut and a meeting with Baba-Yaga herself (One of the hut's rooms was actually a gate to the abyss which Baby-Yaga could command to open virtually anywhere on the plane).

Of course, Baba-Yaga wasn't going to help the party and betray her "friend" without a substantial reward and a frightfully difficult quest that would question the parties' alignment.  More adventures and plot threads. . . most of this came to me after reading the module and thinking how it could be used in our campaign.


"Gleemonex makes it feel like it's seventy-two degrees in your head... all... the... time! "

  

User avatar

Prolific Collector

Posts: 851
Joined: Jun 12, 2004
Last Visit: Apr 07, 2021

Post Posted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 4:05 pm 
 

You know, the way they described Baba Yaga's Hut in that issue, I would have sworn it was a TARDIS.  It almost made me want to replace the Hut with the TARDIS and shuttle everyone over to a Doctor Who RPG.



  


Prolific Collector
Valuation Board

Posts: 682
Joined: Oct 13, 2003
Last Visit: Sep 13, 2019
Location: Denver, CO

Post Posted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 4:39 pm 
 

In my campaign, every world on the Prime Material (and several lower planes) had an identical hut, with the identical door as the multiple gateways.  The place was sacrosanct - no violence could be committed by anyone, unless Baba Yaga decided she wanted to eat someone.  Usually the "maidservant" (a shapeshifted Type V demon) would be there.  You would walk in, sometimes brushing shoulders with a lich that just entered from another world to seek advice on longevity, or a ki-rin coming to bargain for the life of a kidnapped servant.  It made a great beginning point for starting high-level adventures - Baba Yaga became a major NPC, because sometimes the legends the PCs needed to start a quest were locked away in her mind.  Grisly side-quests and disturbing "prices" were to be had before every such adventure.  The PCs loved her, but they were always too freaked out to even think of exploring the hut.

  

User avatar

Grandstanding Collector
Acaeum Donor

Posts: 7949
Joined: Jun 23, 2003
Last Visit: Apr 15, 2021
Location: DFW TX

Post Posted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 10:15 pm 
 

darkseraphim wrote:In my campaign, every world on the Prime Material (and several lower planes) had an identical hut, with the identical door as the multiple gateways.  The place was sacrosanct - no violence could be committed by anyone, unless Baba Yaga decided she wanted to eat someone.  Usually the "maidservant" (a shapeshifted Type V demon) would be there.  You would walk in, sometimes brushing shoulders with a lich that just entered from another world to seek advice on longevity, or a ki-rin coming to bargain for the life of a kidnapped servant.  It made a great beginning point for starting high-level adventures - Baba Yaga became a major NPC, because sometimes the legends the PCs needed to start a quest were locked away in her mind.  Grisly side-quests and disturbing "prices" were to be had before every such adventure.  The PCs loved her, but they were always too freaked out to even think of exploring the hut.


Moore's version of the hut was by far the best published by TSR...a later 2nd edition publication was a dud.  They would have done far better by just dusting off Moore's version and updating it.  

Mike B.

 WWW  

User avatar

Grandstanding Collector
Acaeum Donor

Posts: 7949
Joined: Jun 23, 2003
Last Visit: Apr 15, 2021
Location: DFW TX

Post Posted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 10:25 pm 
 

dzubak wrote:Traveller,
Quest for the Midas Orb was published in issue #61.  It has some decent rooms and encounters but I was a bit let down by the conclusion of it.


Interestingly, and don't ask why, I ran this once as an underwater adventure...again, don't ask why.

Fedifensor was published in issue #67 and is a great adventure.  The Dragon#67 also included a large article on the astral plane.  A very good issue indeed.  I've never had the pleasure of playing or DMing this one but it is on my dream list.
 

Fedifensor was nice, and while running it one of my gamers pulled one of the best surprise tactics that I've ever seen and that my gaming group still talks about to this day. Add to this fact the guy was a stoner and probably wasted when he did it makes it even more incredible.  I'll get to it later when I review this module.

Bbarsh,
The module with the magic spear and the plague is Citadel by the Sea from issue #78.  A great low level (1-2) adventure pitting the players against a small clan of orcs who have penentrated an old fortress in search of the magic spear that is a bane to elvenkind.


An absolute classic. I'll review this one later.

Some of my other favorites Dragon adventures include:
Wandering Trees(#57):  a mid-level adventure that has the party exploring an ancient druidic ruin that was wiped out years ago by a barbarian horde.  A truly great adventure that includes a large wilderness area and with many encounters (in addition to the extensive ruined complex).


Good outdoor run for druid characters who are always bitching about not being able to use their powers (yes my group had one).

Chagmat (#63):  another good low level adventure that I've run multiple times.  Using a cliched plot hook (rescue missing villagers), the adventures travel to an old dungeon in a mountain to combat an old foe (humaniod spiders) that terrorized the region decades prior.  I enjoy it because there are some good encounters, the finale is a good battle and the new monster is pretty cool.


The humanoid spiders were a very cool villain, and being as they weren't in the Monster Manual a good surprise to use agains players (who as everyone knows who gamed back then, had the MM memorized front, back and sideways).

Into the Forgotten Realms (#95):  a really mid-level good dungeon crawl into an old wizardry school, althougth it contents plot elements specific to the Forgotten Realms and the final encounter could easily result in a TPK.


If the party doesn't panic and try to fight the senile Lich, it can be a really, really funny (yet suspenseful) encounter, with lots of roleplaying.  

Aesirhamar (#93):  a high level adventure that takes the party to the outer planes (where the Norse gods reside) in search of a rogue giant with a powerful hammer.  I liked it because it added a new element for the players to experience.


Never ran this one...

Ruins of Andril (#81):  a mid/high-level desert adventure that involves the adventures finding an egyptian temple that is only appears once a year (or so) and sinks back into the sand after a day.


Another classic, I'll review it later.

Halls of Beoll-Dur (#41):  classic dungeon crawl into a dwarven temple complex.  I just loved the maps.  


I ran this once upon a time, and the party had lots of fun, but re-reading it recently...well, it's about the same quality as a fair Judge's Guild module at the time.  Not as good as I remember it being!

Mike B.

 WWW  

User avatar

Grandstanding Collector
Acaeum Donor

Posts: 7949
Joined: Jun 23, 2003
Last Visit: Apr 15, 2021
Location: DFW TX

Post Posted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 10:59 pm 
 

Here's another of my favorite Dragon magazine adventures, winners of the great Module Design Contest.  Obviously, I'm not the only one who had some good memories about the module, because Christopher Perkinds did a remake!
Can Seapoint Be Saved? by Bob Waldbauer was published in Dragon #75, July 1983.  Eleven years later, an updated 2nd edition version titled "North of Narborel" was published in Dungeon magazine #49, Sept/Oct 1994.  The later version was much the same only updated to 2nd edition, cleaned up a bit, although certain things like the map are exactly the same. Either version is a nice little sea adventure for a campaign based out of a port town or on board ship.
    Back in the days of 1st edition, there were really no shipboard adventures. In the U-series, some of the adventures took place aboard a ship (U1) or underwater (U3), but neither really involved any actual sailing around. This adventure also kind of scoots past the actual sailing part, as most of the action takes place in the town of Riverneck or the lair of the pirates that have been disrupting shipping.  However, if the DM wishes there can be ship battles with the pirate's ship, either at dock or on the seas, and the party may be unpleasantly surprised if they meet these pirates in the middle of the ocean for a battle....
    There is a long set up to this adventure, basically the port city of Seapoint is raking in the cash due to explosive rise in commerce along the coast of generic nation.  Suddenly, entire ships and cargoes are disappearing and the wrecked hulls are washing up on shore, with no evidence of crews or cargo.  The raids begin to come more frequently, and nearly every merchant in the city has lost ships (ruling out a conspiracy within the merchants themselves).  The Seapoint city council coughs up a 5000 GP reward to anyone who can stop the raids, which is where the avaricious charaters enter the action.  
  The action starts as the characters go on the one clue available, that a ship resembling a lost vessel docked at the port town of Riverneck south down the coast recently.  The party upon arriving in Riverneck can explore the very small town (expanded more in Perkins version, as well as certain town personalities) and wait until the ship in question docks. This is when the adventure really begins.  The characters are expected to take over the stolen merchant ship and sail it to the mysterious pirate base, although details are skimpy on how this happens (fleshed out more in the Perkins version).  Depending on where this occurs, there can be a lot of fireworks, because the pirates have a couple of dangerous allies/leaders...a 9th level mage and his charmed Dragon Turtle.  The Dragon Turtle is a surprise foe since nothing seems to point to his presence, and it's a good little addition to the adventure and a tough foe for mid level to even high level characters.  
    When I have run this adventure, the player characters either followed the pirate ship back to it's base (by having an invisible stowaway signal the party's ship) or got their own merchant ship to be attacked (only to be quite surprised by the Dragon Turtle attacking with the pirates!).  There are many inventive ways to get back to the pirate's base, where all the real fun and games can really begin in the natural caves and caverns the pirates use to dock their ship and house their crew.  The mage and the pirates are suitable foes, powerful and deadly, and the dragon turtle is the wild card that makes the adventure quite interesting...the party can either leave it alone and try to finish the adventure by just taking out the pirates, or rightly assume the giant reptile has a large pile of goodies and take him out too, probably losing a few party members in the process but getting a nice horde in the process.  
   While the Dungeon magazine version fleshes out the adventure from 8 pages to 13 pages, either version is fun to run and I've gamed both versions as a DM.  I really like this adventure as a fill-in type that can be played in a couple of sessions between long-term campaign considerations, especially if the campaign is based in a coastal or port town.  All in all, it still stands up pretty nicely today and could easily be used in any campaign with little work.


Mike B.

 WWW  

User avatar

Verbose Collector
Acaeum Donor

Posts: 1709
Joined: Feb 04, 2004
Last Visit: Aug 23, 2016
Location: Chandler, AZ

Post Posted: Thu Oct 21, 2004 5:23 am 
 

About six months ago I realized (for the first time) that the modules in Dragon Mags were always the center insert and came with a "black and white" cover page with art.

I am sure many others have known about this, but it dawned on me that I could remove the modules from the mags and create a little collection of adventures.  Now. . . I only decided to do this because all my old Dragon Mags are pretty shoddy - many had lost their covers!

So, I was able to dispose of some dead weight Dragons with a good conscience and start a little collection.  

I now have The Dancing Hut, Can Seapoint Be Saved, Citadel By the Sea, Valley of the Earth Mother, Betrayed, Barnacus: City in Peril, Forest of Doom and Quest for the Midas Orb neatly set aside and bagged.

Okay, no real value there, but they are available and handy for quick reference or play (if the day ever comes that I play again. . .  :cry:  )

A decent enough use for old Dragons. . . eventually I will get a collection of all the old modules.


"Gleemonex makes it feel like it's seventy-two degrees in your head... all... the... time! "

  


Active Collector

Posts: 55
Joined: May 28, 2004
Last Visit: Oct 17, 2006

Post Posted: Thu Oct 21, 2004 10:40 am 
 

Btb,
That is exactly what I did with my Dragon modules years ago - removed them and put them in their own colleciton.  Kinda bummed that I don't have a mint collection of Dragons, but I doubt I will ever sell them so it doesn't matter.

You should start looking on eBay for the individual modules.  I've seen several listing over the past few months on my quest to complete my Dragon collection.

Good luck.
-b

  

User avatar

Grandstanding Collector
Acaeum Donor

Posts: 7949
Joined: Jun 23, 2003
Last Visit: Apr 15, 2021
Location: DFW TX

Post Posted: Thu Oct 21, 2004 10:46 am 
 

beyondthebreach wrote:About six months ago I realized (for the first time) that the modules in Dragon Mags were always the center insert and came with a "black and white" cover page with art.

I am sure many others have known about this, but it dawned on me that I could remove the modules from the mags and create a little collection of adventures.  Now. . . I only decided to do this because all my old Dragon Mags are pretty shoddy - many had lost their covers!

So, I was able to dispose of some dead weight Dragons with a good conscience and start a little collection.  

I now have The Dancing Hut, Can Seapoint Be Saved, Citadel By the Sea, Valley of the Earth Mother, Betrayed, Barnacus: City in Peril, Forest of Doom and Quest for the Midas Orb neatly set aside and bagged.

Okay, no real value there, but they are available and handy for quick reference or play (if the day ever comes that I play again. . .  :cry:  )

A decent enough use for old Dragons. . . eventually I will get a collection of all the old modules.


Great minds think alike...I've done the same thing over the years as I bought collections and weeded out the more beat up issues, always saving the inserts whatever they may be.  I have pretty much a complete collection of these now, as BTB set aside for occassional use. The nice thing about these is that Ive already converted most of these to 2nd edition, so they are ready to play, by their nature make nice one shot adventures for a single session, and as I have run most of them multiple times, I can almost DM them in my sleep.

Mike B.

 WWW  


Prolific Collector
Valuation Board

Posts: 682
Joined: Oct 13, 2003
Last Visit: Sep 13, 2019
Location: Denver, CO

Post Posted: Thu Oct 21, 2004 2:27 pm 
 

For what it's worth, I always thought House of Cards had one of the coolest premises ever.  Never played it, though.  I believe it's in Dungeon Adventures #19.

  
Next
Post new topic Reply to topic Page 1 of 21, 2